Closing the Health Gap http://closingthehealthgap.org Mon, 28 Nov 2016 19:41:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.6.1 Cincinnati Black Theater Company Presents Black Nativity http://closingthehealthgap.org/cincinnati-black-theater-company-presents-black-nativity/ http://closingthehealthgap.org/cincinnati-black-theater-company-presents-black-nativity/#comments Mon, 28 Nov 2016 19:41:12 +0000 Matt Vander Laan http://closingthehealthgap.org/?p=6566

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Black Nativity

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New Vision Holiday Celebration http://closingthehealthgap.org/new-vision-holiday-celebration/ http://closingthehealthgap.org/new-vision-holiday-celebration/#comments Mon, 21 Nov 2016 18:42:00 +0000 Matt Vander Laan http://closingthehealthgap.org/?p=6561

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Strengthening Our Commitment to Health Equity; 10/30/16 http://closingthehealthgap.org/strengthening-commitment-health-equity-103016/ http://closingthehealthgap.org/strengthening-commitment-health-equity-103016/#comments Sun, 30 Oct 2016 14:34:30 +0000 Matt Vander Laan http://closingthehealthgap.org/?p=6539

 

Pollack, R. (2016). Strengthening Our Commitment to Health Equity. Hospitals & Health Networks. Retrieved from: http://www.hhnmag.com/articles/7608-strengthening-our-hospitals-commitment-to-health-equity.

http://www.hhnmag.com/articles/7608-strengthening-our-hospitals-commitment-to-health-equity

Health disparities for many racially diverse individuals still persist among healthcare systems. Inequities in terms of health conditions as well as treatment are present, for example, diabetes is significantly higher among Latino Americans as compared to white counterparts. One third of patients on dialysis due to kidney failure are African Americans, even though the entire population is only 13% African American. And for recommended treatment administering times, minority patients tend ...

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Pollack, R. (2016). Strengthening Our Commitment to Health Equity. Hospitals & Health Networks. Retrieved from: http://www.hhnmag.com/articles/7608-strengthening-our-hospitals-commitment-to-health-equity.

http://www.hhnmag.com/articles/7608-strengthening-our-hospitals-commitment-to-health-equity

Health disparities for many racially diverse individuals still persist among healthcare systems. Inequities in terms of health conditions as well as treatment are present, for example, diabetes is significantly higher among Latino Americans as compared to white counterparts. One third of patients on dialysis due to kidney failure are African Americans, even though the entire population is only 13% African American. And for recommended treatment administering times, minority patients tend to not receive treatment when necessary.

These disparities are caused by a number of factors, including health insurance coverage, discrimination, and the lack of addressing the social determinants of health. In order to eliminate health disparities, the #123forEquity Pledge Act campaign was launched in 2015. By asking healthcare professionals to increase data collection on race, ethnicity, and language, increasing training dedicated to cultural competency, and increasing leadership diversity, the campaign aims to reduce and eventually eliminate health disparities.

Currently, more than 1,200 hospitals have taken the pledge, and are utilizing community partnerships to improve care and health outcomes of patients. Healthcare systems must work to understand why disparities exist in order to fully diminish the problem.

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Race Masks Health-Disparity Complexity; 10/29/16 http://closingthehealthgap.org/race-masks-health-disparity-complexity-102916/ http://closingthehealthgap.org/race-masks-health-disparity-complexity-102916/#comments Sat, 29 Oct 2016 14:33:49 +0000 Matt Vander Laan http://closingthehealthgap.org/?p=6537

 

Jaffe, E. (2016). Race Masks Health-Disparity Complexity. Association for Psychological Science. Retrieved from: http://www.psychologicalscience.org/video/jackson-kicks-off-aps-convention.html.

 

http://www.psychologicalscience.org/video/jackson-kicks-off-aps-convention.html

 

At the 24th APS Annual Convention, the topic of disparities being associated with race was discussed, with this association particularly in question.

 

Although few physical differences exist among Whites and Blacks during early childhood, race continues to be named as the sole purpose for health disparities across these groups. Many disparities are indeed present when considering Black and White populations, including that Black individuals tend to have higher rates of smoking, obesity, low ...

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Jaffe, E. (2016). Race Masks Health-Disparity Complexity. Association for Psychological Science. Retrieved from: http://www.psychologicalscience.org/video/jackson-kicks-off-aps-convention.html.

 

http://www.psychologicalscience.org/video/jackson-kicks-off-aps-convention.html

 

At the 24th APS Annual Convention, the topic of disparities being associated with race was discussed, with this association particularly in question.

 

Although few physical differences exist among Whites and Blacks during early childhood, race continues to be named as the sole purpose for health disparities across these groups. Many disparities are indeed present when considering Black and White populations, including that Black individuals tend to have higher rates of smoking, obesity, low physical activity, and drug abuse. However, African Americans have been found to have better mental health than Whites, including less rates of depressive disorders.

 

Instead of placing race as the one and only reason for differences among groups, Jackson of the University of Michigan believes that multiple factors lead to disparities. These factors include cultural factors and how individuals respond to stress, as well as what coping mechanisms are utilized. In this case, bad coping mechanisms lead to more negative health outcomes. In research conducted by Jackson and others, disparities still exist even when manipulating data to control for race.

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In Ferguson, a Picture of Health Disparities; 10/28/16 http://closingthehealthgap.org/ferguson-picture-health-disparities-102816/ http://closingthehealthgap.org/ferguson-picture-health-disparities-102816/#comments Fri, 28 Oct 2016 14:33:03 +0000 Matt Vander Laan http://closingthehealthgap.org/?p=6535

 

Leonard, K. (2016). In Ferguson, a Picture of Health Disparities. U.S. News. Retrieved from: http://www.usnews.com/news/articles/2016-10-14/in-ferguson-a-picture-of-health-disparities.

 

http://www.usnews.com/news/articles/2016-10-14/in-ferguson-a-picture-of-health-disparities

 

The city of Ferguson today provides a prime example as to how where people live highly affects length of life and health outcomes. While one part of the city includes fast-food restaurants such as McDonald’s, dollar stores, and liquor stores, another part of Ferguson is booming with large homes, farmer’s markets, libraries, and other areas for the public. Ferguson will likely take decades of improvement before services and resources that improve ...

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Leonard, K. (2016). In Ferguson, a Picture of Health Disparities. U.S. News. Retrieved from: http://www.usnews.com/news/articles/2016-10-14/in-ferguson-a-picture-of-health-disparities.

 

http://www.usnews.com/news/articles/2016-10-14/in-ferguson-a-picture-of-health-disparities

 

The city of Ferguson today provides a prime example as to how where people live highly affects length of life and health outcomes. While one part of the city includes fast-food restaurants such as McDonald’s, dollar stores, and liquor stores, another part of Ferguson is booming with large homes, farmer’s markets, libraries, and other areas for the public. Ferguson will likely take decades of improvement before services and resources that improve the quality of life affect individuals living in the city.

 

Currently, 23% of the St. Louis population is compromised of African Americans, all more likely to die at a younger age than white counterparts. This statistic becomes even more shocking when comparing data by zip code, as distance by just a few miles may show African Americans dying 18 years sooner. Data also revealed African Americans are 17 times more likely to be injured by firearms, and six times more likely to be injured from other conditions including abuse, neglect, or rape. More emergency mental health treatment as well as treatment for chronic diseases and other medical conditions are needed for African Americans in the city.

 

Proposals through the Ferguson Commission Report, “Forward through Ferguson” have outlined more than one hundred proposals aimed at improving law enforcement, as well as social determinants of health, including education, housing, and transportation. These efforts hope to decrease poverty among African Americans, provide more education, and make other improvements in order to better the quality of life of residents.

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Breast Cancer Rates are Down, but Racial Disparities Persist; 10/27/16 http://closingthehealthgap.org/breast-cancer-rates-racial-disparities-persist-102716/ http://closingthehealthgap.org/breast-cancer-rates-racial-disparities-persist-102716/#comments Thu, 27 Oct 2016 14:32:16 +0000 Matt Vander Laan http://closingthehealthgap.org/?p=6533

 

Shute, N. (2016). Breast Cancer Rates are Down, but Racial Disparities Persist. NPR. Retrieved from: http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/10/13/497793332/breast-cancer-death-rates-are-down-but-racial-disparities-persist

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/10/13/497793332/breast-cancer-death-rates-are-down-but-racial-disparities-persist

 

A recent report published by the Center for Disease Control (CDC) states breast cancer rates have decreased over the past decade; however drop is more among white women. Findings revealed a 1.9% decrease in breast cancer rates among white women, and 1.4% decrease among black women.

The study also found that older black women are more likely to die due to breast cancer as compared to white counterparts, and black women ...

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Shute, N. (2016). Breast Cancer Rates are Down, but Racial Disparities Persist. NPR. Retrieved from: http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/10/13/497793332/breast-cancer-death-rates-are-down-but-racial-disparities-persist

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/10/13/497793332/breast-cancer-death-rates-are-down-but-racial-disparities-persist

 

A recent report published by the Center for Disease Control (CDC) states breast cancer rates have decreased over the past decade; however drop is more among white women. Findings revealed a 1.9% decrease in breast cancer rates among white women, and 1.4% decrease among black women.

The study also found that older black women are more likely to die due to breast cancer as compared to white counterparts, and black women overall are 41% more likely to die as a result of breast cancer. These findings are significant and in need of approaching, as black women forty years ago were less likely than white counterparts to have breast cancer.

Researchers believe many factors contribute to this racial disparity among women and breast cancer risk, including consumption of calorie-dense foods, lack of exercise, and obesity. Access to care is also mentioned as a factor, causing black women to receive less optimal care than white counterparts.

Findings from this study stress the importance of providing better care that is high quality and available to all women, in order to eliminate this racial disparity.

 

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Ethnic Disparities in Pediatric Psychiatric Treatment Hard to Ignore; 10/26/16 http://closingthehealthgap.org/ethnic-disparities-pediatric-psychiatric-treatment-hard-ignore-102616/ http://closingthehealthgap.org/ethnic-disparities-pediatric-psychiatric-treatment-hard-ignore-102616/#comments Wed, 26 Oct 2016 14:31:31 +0000 Matt Vander Laan http://closingthehealthgap.org/?p=6531

 

Lutz, R. (2016). Ethnic Disparities in Pediatric Psychiatric Treatment Hard to Ignore. HCP Live. Retrieved from: http://www.hcplive.com/medical-news/ethnic-disparities-in-pediatric-psychiatric-treatment-hard-to-ignore.

 

http://www.hcplive.com/medical-news/ethnic-disparities-in-pediatric-psychiatric-treatment-hard-to-ignore

 

Findings from a study published in the International Journal of Health Services conclude the need for more, unbiased mental health services provided to minority children and youth. The study concludes disparities in mental health treatment among minority patients are present, and these disparities are also seen in substance abuse treatment.

 

Using data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys ranging from 2006-2012, it was found that while all youth, including individuals ...

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Lutz, R. (2016). Ethnic Disparities in Pediatric Psychiatric Treatment Hard to Ignore. HCP Live. Retrieved from: http://www.hcplive.com/medical-news/ethnic-disparities-in-pediatric-psychiatric-treatment-hard-to-ignore.

 

http://www.hcplive.com/medical-news/ethnic-disparities-in-pediatric-psychiatric-treatment-hard-to-ignore

 

Findings from a study published in the International Journal of Health Services conclude the need for more, unbiased mental health services provided to minority children and youth. The study concludes disparities in mental health treatment among minority patients are present, and these disparities are also seen in substance abuse treatment.

 

Using data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys ranging from 2006-2012, it was found that while all youth, including individuals of minorities as well as whites have similar mental health needs, Black and Latino children are significantly less likely to receive mental health treatment as compared to white counterparts. For all white youths who received substance abuse counseling, only one seventh of black youths received similar counseling.

 

The significance of these findings is in addressing the overrepresentation of minorities in the criminal justice system, and the underrepresentation when it comes to mental health. African American children are more likely to get into trouble while at school, including suspensions, however mental health is not adequately being addressed.

 

While no significant differences were found based on income or insurance, female children were less likely to receive treatment in males, and female youths were more likely to receive treatment than males.

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Poverty, Welfare, and Religion Symposium: http://closingthehealthgap.org/poverty-welfare-religion-symposium/ http://closingthehealthgap.org/poverty-welfare-religion-symposium/#comments Tue, 25 Oct 2016 15:25:51 +0000 Matt Vander Laan http://closingthehealthgap.org/?p=6551

Health Gap founder and executive director Dwight Tillery will also present along with Health Gap COO Renee Mahaffey Harris.

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Health Gap founder and executive director Dwight Tillery will also present along with Health Gap COO Renee Mahaffey Harris.

Click to enlarge picture.

povertyconference

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Nonwhite, low-income patients less likely to use electronic patient portals; 10/25/16 http://closingthehealthgap.org/nonwhite-low-income-patients-less-likely-use-electronic-patient-portals-102516/ http://closingthehealthgap.org/nonwhite-low-income-patients-less-likely-use-electronic-patient-portals-102516/#comments Tue, 25 Oct 2016 14:30:41 +0000 Matt Vander Laan http://closingthehealthgap.org/?p=6529

 

Nonwhite, low-income patients less likely to use electronic patient portals. (2016). Healio: Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine. Retrieved from: http://www.healio.com/family-medicine/practice-management/news/online/%7B1066539c-0d98-4132-a9eb-3372ee2aa3e5%7D/nonwhite-low-income-patients-less-likely-to-use-electronic-patient-portals

 

http://www.healio.com/family-medicine/practice-management/news/online/%7B1066539c-0d98-4132-a9eb-3372ee2aa3e5%7D/nonwhite-low-income-patients-less-likely-to-use-electronic-patient-portals

 

According to data from the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine, electronic patient portals were found to be less used by nonwhite and low-income individuals, as well as patients who primarily speak Spanish. These findings were found to be significant when comparing utilization to white counterparts.

 

Electronic patient portals allow patients to schedule appointments, see laboratory testing results, renew prescriptions, and provide ...

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Nonwhite, low-income patients less likely to use electronic patient portals. (2016). Healio: Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine. Retrieved from: http://www.healio.com/family-medicine/practice-management/news/online/%7B1066539c-0d98-4132-a9eb-3372ee2aa3e5%7D/nonwhite-low-income-patients-less-likely-to-use-electronic-patient-portals

 

http://www.healio.com/family-medicine/practice-management/news/online/%7B1066539c-0d98-4132-a9eb-3372ee2aa3e5%7D/nonwhite-low-income-patients-less-likely-to-use-electronic-patient-portals

 

According to data from the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine, electronic patient portals were found to be less used by nonwhite and low-income individuals, as well as patients who primarily speak Spanish. These findings were found to be significant when comparing utilization to white counterparts.

 

Electronic patient portals allow patients to schedule appointments, see laboratory testing results, renew prescriptions, and provide other tools to patients without having to travel to their source of care. With many underserved populations having difficulties accessing care, the use of electronic health systems provides a resource to access care without having to travel. These systems also allow patients to become more involved in their own health.

 

The study included 36,549 patients among 13 states who were offered the MyChart tool for one year. Among the states that participated was Ohio, as well as California, Texas, and North Carolina among others. The study found that 29% of patients logged into the MyChart system, and 6% of patients logged in twice or more per month.

 

The results of this study reveal the need to further investigate and strategize ways to increase access to care, through utilization tools and other methods. An example of a possible idea the article mentions is providing workshops to patients with MyChart, in order for patients to receive help setting up their account, and instruction on how to use the system.

 

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Black Women are Dying at Higher Rates than White Women, and the Disparity is Growing; 10/24/16 http://closingthehealthgap.org/black-women-dying-higher-rates-white-women-disparity-growing-102416/ http://closingthehealthgap.org/black-women-dying-higher-rates-white-women-disparity-growing-102416/#comments Mon, 24 Oct 2016 14:28:31 +0000 Matt Vander Laan http://closingthehealthgap.org/?p=6527

 

New Avon Foundation-Funded Breast Cancer Study Finds Black Women are Dying at Higher Rates than White Women, and the Disparity is Growing. (2016). Avon Foundation for Women. Retrieved from: http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/new-avon-foundation-funded-breast-cancer-study-finds-black-women-are-dying-at-higher-rates-than-white-women-and-the-disparity-is-growing-300337980.html

 

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/new-avon-foundation-funded-breast-cancer-study-finds-black-women-are-dying-at-higher-rates-than-white-women-and-the-disparity-is-growing-300337980.html

 

A study conducted by Sinai Urban Health Institute funded by the Avon Foundation for Women was released today. The study included the 50 largest cities in the United States, using data from 2005-2014, focused on breast cancer disparities. By looking at breast cancer mortality among black and white women, the study found black women die from ...

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New Avon Foundation-Funded Breast Cancer Study Finds Black Women are Dying at Higher Rates than White Women, and the Disparity is Growing. (2016). Avon Foundation for Women. Retrieved from: http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/new-avon-foundation-funded-breast-cancer-study-finds-black-women-are-dying-at-higher-rates-than-white-women-and-the-disparity-is-growing-300337980.html

 

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/new-avon-foundation-funded-breast-cancer-study-finds-black-women-are-dying-at-higher-rates-than-white-women-and-the-disparity-is-growing-300337980.html

 

A study conducted by Sinai Urban Health Institute funded by the Avon Foundation for Women was released today. The study included the 50 largest cities in the United States, using data from 2005-2014, focused on breast cancer disparities. By looking at breast cancer mortality among black and white women, the study found black women die from breast cancer at a higher rate than white counterparts. This disparity was found to exist in all cities.

 

From 2010 to 2014, the breast cancer mortality rate was 30.7 deaths per 100,000 for black women, and 21.4 deaths per 100,000 for white women. Across the U.S., black women were found to be 43% more likely to die from breast cancer than their white counterparts. Cities were also ranked by these disparities, with Atlanta having the largest increase in disparity over the course of the study. Decreases in disparities, however, occurred in Memphis, Philadelphia, and Boston.

 

A co-author of the study, Bijou Hunt, states this information should be utilized by health officials in different cities to better develop and implement strategies to improve health disparities. More research will also need to take place in order to better understand why this disparity is present, including examining the screening and treatment processes for African American women.

 

Breast cancer is currently the second leading cause of cancer death among women in the U.S.

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