Issues & News

Health Expo ScreeningThe Health Gap is on the forefront of health issues throughout Cincinnati and the nation. 

We continuously gather news pertaining to the issues closest to our mission and those most affected by them. This section serves as a resource to that information.

For the most up-to-date health news from around the country, visit our RSS feeds.

Talent Show Auditions Video Submission Form

April 13, 2017

Auditions Information2017 Health Expo Talent Competition – April 29, 2017 So you think you’ve got talent? Calling all talent aged 8-28 to audition for the 2017 Health Expo Talent Competition. We invite you perform or create a piece of work to perform. Song, short play, dance routine, spoken word, etc. All talent is welcome!

We are accepting video talent audition submissions until April 21st.

How to submit:

1. Email hgtalentcomp@gmail.com with your name, age, name of performance and phone number and a link to your video.

2. Submit …

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Share your Health Gap Story with us!

March 15, 2017

Share your Health Gap storyName *
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2017 14th Annual Health Expo Volunteer Sign-up Form

January 11, 2017

The 14th Annual Health Expo is right around the corner.  The Expo is April 29th, 2017 at Washington Park.  Please fill out the 2017 Health Expo Volunteer Form.

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Strengthening Our Commitment to Health Equity; 10/30/16

October 30, 2016

 

Pollack, R. (2016). Strengthening Our Commitment to Health Equity. Hospitals & Health Networks. Retrieved from: http://www.hhnmag.com/articles/7608-strengthening-our-hospitals-commitment-to-health-equity.

http://www.hhnmag.com/articles/7608-strengthening-our-hospitals-commitment-to-health-equity

Health disparities for many racially diverse individuals still persist among healthcare systems. Inequities in terms of health conditions as well as treatment are present, for example, diabetes is significantly higher among Latino Americans as compared to white counterparts. One third of patients on dialysis due to kidney failure are African Americans, even though the entire population is only 13% African American. And for recommended treatment administering times, minority patients tend …

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Race Masks Health-Disparity Complexity; 10/29/16

October 29, 2016

 

Jaffe, E. (2016). Race Masks Health-Disparity Complexity. Association for Psychological Science. Retrieved from: http://www.psychologicalscience.org/video/jackson-kicks-off-aps-convention.html.

 

http://www.psychologicalscience.org/video/jackson-kicks-off-aps-convention.html

 

At the 24th APS Annual Convention, the topic of disparities being associated with race was discussed, with this association particularly in question.

 

Although few physical differences exist among Whites and Blacks during early childhood, race continues to be named as the sole purpose for health disparities across these groups. Many disparities are indeed present when considering Black and White populations, including that Black individuals tend to have higher rates of smoking, obesity, low …

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In Ferguson, a Picture of Health Disparities; 10/28/16

October 28, 2016

 

Leonard, K. (2016). In Ferguson, a Picture of Health Disparities. U.S. News. Retrieved from: http://www.usnews.com/news/articles/2016-10-14/in-ferguson-a-picture-of-health-disparities.

 

http://www.usnews.com/news/articles/2016-10-14/in-ferguson-a-picture-of-health-disparities

 

The city of Ferguson today provides a prime example as to how where people live highly affects length of life and health outcomes. While one part of the city includes fast-food restaurants such as McDonald’s, dollar stores, and liquor stores, another part of Ferguson is booming with large homes, farmer’s markets, libraries, and other areas for the public. Ferguson will likely take decades of improvement before services and resources that improve …

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Breast Cancer Rates are Down, but Racial Disparities Persist; 10/27/16

October 27, 2016

 

Shute, N. (2016). Breast Cancer Rates are Down, but Racial Disparities Persist. NPR. Retrieved from: http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/10/13/497793332/breast-cancer-death-rates-are-down-but-racial-disparities-persist

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/10/13/497793332/breast-cancer-death-rates-are-down-but-racial-disparities-persist

 

A recent report published by the Center for Disease Control (CDC) states breast cancer rates have decreased over the past decade; however drop is more among white women. Findings revealed a 1.9% decrease in breast cancer rates among white women, and 1.4% decrease among black women.

The study also found that older black women are more likely to die due to breast cancer as compared to white counterparts, and black women …

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Ethnic Disparities in Pediatric Psychiatric Treatment Hard to Ignore; 10/26/16

October 26, 2016

 

Lutz, R. (2016). Ethnic Disparities in Pediatric Psychiatric Treatment Hard to Ignore. HCP Live. Retrieved from: http://www.hcplive.com/medical-news/ethnic-disparities-in-pediatric-psychiatric-treatment-hard-to-ignore.

 

http://www.hcplive.com/medical-news/ethnic-disparities-in-pediatric-psychiatric-treatment-hard-to-ignore

 

Findings from a study published in the International Journal of Health Services conclude the need for more, unbiased mental health services provided to minority children and youth. The study concludes disparities in mental health treatment among minority patients are present, and these disparities are also seen in substance abuse treatment.

 

Using data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys ranging from 2006-2012, it was found that while all youth, including individuals …

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Nonwhite, low-income patients less likely to use electronic patient portals; 10/25/16

October 25, 2016

 

Nonwhite, low-income patients less likely to use electronic patient portals. (2016). Healio: Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine. Retrieved from: http://www.healio.com/family-medicine/practice-management/news/online/%7B1066539c-0d98-4132-a9eb-3372ee2aa3e5%7D/nonwhite-low-income-patients-less-likely-to-use-electronic-patient-portals

 

http://www.healio.com/family-medicine/practice-management/news/online/%7B1066539c-0d98-4132-a9eb-3372ee2aa3e5%7D/nonwhite-low-income-patients-less-likely-to-use-electronic-patient-portals

 

According to data from the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine, electronic patient portals were found to be less used by nonwhite and low-income individuals, as well as patients who primarily speak Spanish. These findings were found to be significant when comparing utilization to white counterparts.

 

Electronic patient portals allow patients to schedule appointments, see laboratory testing results, renew prescriptions, and provide …

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Black Women are Dying at Higher Rates than White Women, and the Disparity is Growing; 10/24/16

October 24, 2016

 

New Avon Foundation-Funded Breast Cancer Study Finds Black Women are Dying at Higher Rates than White Women, and the Disparity is Growing. (2016). Avon Foundation for Women. Retrieved from: http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/new-avon-foundation-funded-breast-cancer-study-finds-black-women-are-dying-at-higher-rates-than-white-women-and-the-disparity-is-growing-300337980.html

 

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/new-avon-foundation-funded-breast-cancer-study-finds-black-women-are-dying-at-higher-rates-than-white-women-and-the-disparity-is-growing-300337980.html

 

A study conducted by Sinai Urban Health Institute funded by the Avon Foundation for Women was released today. The study included the 50 largest cities in the United States, using data from 2005-2014, focused on breast cancer disparities. By looking at breast cancer mortality among black and white women, the study found black women die from …

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Supporting Population Health and Reducing Health Inequalities; 10/21/16

October 21, 2016

 

 

Syrop, J. (2016). Supporting Population Health and Reducing Health Inequalities. AJMC. Retrieved from: http://www.ajmc.com/newsroom/supporting-population-health-and-reducing-health-inequalities.

 

http://www.ajmc.com/newsroom/supporting-population-health-and-reducing-health-inequalities

 

Although the United States spends the most on healthcare, the U.S. is still less healthy than many other countries. The U.S. suffers lower life expectancy at birth as well as higher infant mortality rates than all other developed countries. Various authors in this AJMC article provide thoughts and ideas as to how to improve population health in the U.S.

 

Lynn R. Goldman of George Washington University’s Milken Institute School of Public Health believes …

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Diversity and Diagnosis of Women and Minorities; 10/20/16

October 20, 2016

 

Dehghani, P. (2016). Diversity and Diagnosis of Women and Minorities. Cardiovascular Business. Retrieved from: http://www.cardiovascularbusiness.com/topics/practice-management/diversity-diagnosis-women-minorities.

 

http://www.cardiovascularbusiness.com/topics/practice-management/diversity-diagnosis-women-minorities

 

Dr. Payam Dehghani shares the stories of two patients recently seen in a clinic. These patients revealed that many patient outcomes are pre-determined.

 

The first patient, a man in his late 40’s who is a CEO of a national company, came into the clinic for a cardiovascular work-up including a chest X-ray and stress test. All tests appeared to be normal and the man was asymptomatic, so Dr. Dehghani advised the patient …

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Disparities in care quality, access to services a major concern 10/19/16

October 19, 2016

 

Whiteman, H. (2016). Maternal Health: Disparities in care quality, access to services a major concern. Medical News Today. Retrieved from: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/312936.php. 

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/312936.php

Disparities in health care services for both mothers and babies exist on a global scale, with differences seen based on income levels. Information published in the Lancet includes ideas as to how to address these disparities in order to goals adopted via the United Nations last year, known as Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). One piece of the SDGs is to decrease the global mortality rate …

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Surviving: Your Environment’s Impact on Health; 10/18/16

September 19, 2016

 

Surviving: Your Environment’s Impact on Health

 

http://www.richmond.com/article_5edea333-4b31-5a04-bcdb-143e1e17e091.html

 

Demeria, K. (2016). ‘Harsh Reality’ in Richmond: Drugs easily accessible, but fresh fruits are not. Richmond Times-Dispatch. Retrieved from: http://www.richmond.com/article_5edea333-4b31-5a04-bcdb-143e1e17e091.html.

A five-year study conducted by the Virginia Commonwealth University’s Center on Society and Health has shed great light on factors that contribute to health disparities and survival, with many environmental factors playing a large role. The study found that individuals living in impoverished areas, in this case specifically areas of poverty in Richmond, are more likely to live shorter lives than …

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Health Disparities and Access to Care: Cracks in Data; 10/17/16

September 18, 2016

 

Health Disparities and Access to Care: Cracks in Data

 

Artiga, S., Foutz, J., Cornachione, E., Garfield, R. (2016). Key Facts on Health and Health Care By Race and Ethnicity. Kaiser Family Foundation. Retrieved from:

http://www.wlky.com/health/study-racial-disparities-persist-in-us-schools/39944376

Various national datasets ranging from years 2011 to 2015 show an extreme need for more data in order to fully understand and address health disparities across races and ethnicities. Along with data improvements, it is pertinent to have all health disparities identified and documented in order to follow the progress of the disparity …

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Racial Disparities in the Education System: A Lingering Issue; 9/11/16

September 11, 2016

 

Racial Disparities in the Education System: A Lingering Issue

 

Ahmed, S. (2016). Study: Racial Disparities Persist in U.S. Schools. CNN NewSource. Retrieved             from http://www.wlky.com/health/study-racial-disparities-persist-in-us-   schools/39944376

http://www.wlky.com/health/study-racial-disparities-persist-in-us-schools/39944376

After conducting a large sample survey consisting of 50 million students in years 2013-2014, the issue of racial disparities still persists among the education system on a nationwide scale. The Education Department Report gathered from the Civil Rights Data Collection reveals not only a lack in opportunities for some students, but a multitude of problems causing barriers to education attainability.

The first startling …

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Prevalence of Suicide in African American Males: Noted Factors and Importance of Support; 9/12/16

August 27, 2016

 

Prevalence of Suicide in African American Males: Noted Factors and Importance of Support

 

OPA Board of Directors. (2016). Mental Health Issues and Suicide Prevention in African             American Males: MarShawn McCarrell-Black Lives Matter. Ohio Psychological        Association. Retrieved from http://www.ohpsych.org/about/2016/03/04/mental-health-    issues-and-suicide-prevention-in-african-american-males-marshawn-mccarrell-black-     lives-matter/.

http://www.ohpsych.org/about/2016/03/04/mental-health-issues-and-suicide-prevention-in-african-american-males-marshawn-mccarrell-black-lives-matter/

The Center for Disease Control reports the rate of suicide among African American males has nearly doubled since 1993. In terms of leading causes of death, suicide ranks sixteenth across all African American males, third for those ages 15 to 24. Due to the increasing …

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Mental Health: Aftereffects of the Affordable Care Act and Factors Leading to Gaps in Care; 8/24/16

August 24, 2016

 

Mental Health: Aftereffects of the Affordable Care Act and Factors Leading to Gaps in Care; 2016

 

Luthra, S. (2016). Factors Beyond Coverage Limit Mental Health Care Access. Kaiser Health      News. Retrieved from http://khn.org/news/factors-beyond-coverage-limit-mental-health-       care-access/.

http://khn.org/news/factors-beyond-coverage-limit-mental-health-care-access/

Expanding mental healthcare coverage in more health plans including Medicaid and individual market plans is an ongoing goal of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and its implementation, however the burden of mental health conditions still weighs on approximately 44 million Americans today.

Data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health years …

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Is there a racial ‘care gap’ in medical treatment? [Television series episode] (2016, April 5). In PBS (Producer), PBS NEWSHOUR.

July 17, 2016

 

Is there a racial ‘care gap’ in medical treatment? [Television series episode] (2016, April 5). In PBS (Producer), PBS NEWSHOUR.

 

African Americans are being undertreated for pain due to medical students’ false beliefs about biological differences based on race. This is both a medical and sociological problem as deeply embedded myths in U.S. society about racial difference, especially biological differences between races, affect how patients are being treated.

 

This is both a conscious and unconscious stereotype. Societal myths do greatly impact medical student perspectives but these racial distinctions …

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The U.S. implemented the Health People initiative decades ago in order to improve health equity

July 16, 2016

 

The U.S. implemented the Health People initiative decades ago in order to improve health equity, with a goal to eliminate health disparities and achieve health equity by 2020. Many social determinants of health identified here in the U.S. also exist and influence health outcomes in other countries, such as lower income being associated with higher rates of obesity.

 

In a 2008 report by the Commission on Social Determinants of Health, inequities were found to be present both across countries as well as within countries themselves, just …

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Across the United States, income inequality is one of the top influencers of health status

July 15, 2016

 

Across the United States, income inequality is one of the top influencers of health status. In order to address health disparities, our definition of population health should focus on entire populations, and what factors that are causing the population to experience gaps in access to care.

 

Bob Evan’s research from the 1990’s concluded that income inequality plays a strong role, as well as socioeconomic status, in determining both individual health and population health. These findings were also present even after controlling for risky behaviors such as …

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Researchers of Washington University and St. Louis University are focusing on how to improve health and well-being of African Americans in the St. Louis area

July 15, 2016

 

 

Researchers of Washington University and St. Louis University are focusing on how to improve health and well-being of African Americans in the St. Louis area. At the Dansforth Plant Science Center, a forum took place in June centered around creating models in order to improve health, and changes that would be made in order for health models to be more effective.

 

In the past, The For Sake of All Report has noted that race, geographic location, and behavior all may influence health outcomes more so than …

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Inland Empire (2016). Kaiser Permanente Approves Nearly $600,000 in Community Benefit Grants in Riverside County

July 14, 2016

 

Inland Empire (2016). Kaiser Permanente Approves Nearly $600,000 in Community Benefit        Grants in Riverside County. Retrieved from: http://inlandempire.us/kaiser-permanente-  approves-nearly-600000-community-benefit-grants-riverside-county/.

 

http://inlandempire.us/kaiser-permanente-approves-nearly-600000-community-benefit-grants-riverside-county/

 

Kaiser Permanente, a non-profit organization focused on funding programs and education to improve the health of underserved populations, has approved a total of thirty-three grants for 2016. These grants have been approved in order to improve access to primary care, provide medical homes for veterans who are homeless and/or disabled, expand dental services to those who are uninsured, as well as other aspects affecting health outcomes.

 

Although …

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What is institutionalized racism and how is it affecting our communities?

July 14, 2016

 

What is institutionalized racism and how is it affecting our communities?

“When we blame private prejudice and snobbishness for contemporary segregation, we not only whitewash our own history, but avoid considering whether new policies might instead promote an integrated community.” –Richard Rothstein

Racism is the act of withholding social services, benefits and opportunities to individuals based solely on race.

There are 3 levels which this may occur:
Individual

When an individual may cause death, injury, destruction of property, or denial of services or opportunities

Institutional

Policies, practices and procedures of institutions …

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New initiative promises diabetics better control on the disease

July 13, 2016

 

 Tuesday, 13 July 2016

 

New initiative promises diabetics better control on the disease. (2016). Business Standard. Retrieved from: http://www.business-standard.com/article/news-ians/new-initiative-promises-diabetics-better-control-on-the-disease-116071201097_1.html

 

http://www.business-standard.com/article/news-ians/new-initiative-promises-diabetics-better-       control-on-the-disease-116071201097_1.html

 

Researchers from the All India Institute of Medical Sciences and Emory University have found a new Multi-Component Diabetes Quality Improvement Initiative (QI) that may aid in diabetes control among diabetics. This new model is said likely double the chance diabetes is controlled among patients as compared to their usual primary care. This initiative was carried out in a ten year trial at ten clinics in India and …

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State of Black America-Summary

July 13, 2016

 

State of Black America-Summary

 

Overview:

Mission: Providing thoughtful commentary and analysis for politics, cooperate topics, NGOs, academia, and popular culture.

Help promote a sense of empowerment

Equality Index: Provides analysis on racial inequality in America
Black Americans are at a equality percentage of 72.2% compared to average white Americans
Funding needs to be put into developing our urban communities in the US

Since 2006, the US has spent $50 Billion rebuilding Afghanistan
In 2008, $400 billion was spent on the Trouble Asset Relief Program

$1 Trillion Multi-Pronged Approach over the next 5 years …

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Renee Mahaffey Harris on 91.7 WVXU to talk about Food Desserts

June 30, 2016

Here to talk about the changes happening at the neighborhood level in overcoming food deserts are Avondale Mart Owner Anthony Moore; the Center for Closing the Health Gap COO, Renee Mahaffey Harris; and General Manager of Apple Street Market Cooperative, Christopher DeAngelis.

Click here to listen to the broadcast: http://wvxu.org/post/neighborhood-efforts-working-overcome-food-deserts

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The Center for Closing the Health Gap welcomes back Maureen R. Sullivan

June 30, 2016

 

The Center for Closing the Health Gap welcomes back Maureen R. Sullivan as a research consultant for Cincinnati’s Appalachian community.                                                                              

         

Welcome back Maureen!
    News Release

June 29, 2016

MAUREEN SULLIVAN RETURNS TO THE CENTER FOR CLOSING THE HEALTH GAP IN COMMUNITY OUTREACH ROLE

Former Board member …

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Obesity, Zip Code, and Adversity: New Action Toward a Resilient Community Solution

June 23, 2016

 

In one example, teenage girl used food and her obesity to keep people away from her due to her experience with sexual abuse

8% of obesity and 17% of extreme obesity in adults can be attributed to physical, verbal or sexual abuse as children

High levels of Adversity found in certain zip codes correlate to the area’s high rates of diseases such as obesity, diabetes, and heart disease.
Community Resilience=Support at the community level that allows members to recover from their adversity and promote positive health outcomes

Building Community …

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State of Black America-Summary

June 22, 2016

 

Overview:

Mission: Providing thoughtful commentary and analysis for politics, cooperate topics, NGOs, academia, and popular culture.

Help promote a sense of empowerment

Equality Index: Provides analysis on racial inequality in America
Black Americans are at a equality percentage of 72.2% compared to average white Americans
Funding needs to be put into developing our urban communities in the US

Since 2006, the US has spent $50 Billion rebuilding Afghanistan
In 2008, $400 billion was spent on the Trouble Asset Relief Program

$1 Trillion Multi-Pronged Approach over the next 5 years to improve urban …

[ Read More → ]

Is Redlining Still a Problem?

June 21, 2016

 

Redlining was a practice that enforced discriminatory practices against African Americans in the real estate world. Throughout the 1900s, redlining went through numerous transformations to become the real estate practice that exists today. While a historic turning point may have argued to be in 1947 when redlining technically became illegal, this in reality put no stop to the discriminatory practices happening in real estate. This is because these preconceptions and judgments were already set in stone into the real estate market. It was plain and …

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Real Estate Agents of Social Change-Redlining, Reverse Redlining, and Greenlining

June 20, 2016

 

Definitions
Redlining=Federal government, private banks, and other institutions to deny credit to neighborhoods based on race
Reverse Redlining=Marketing inferior credit and products to neighborhoods based on race
Greenlining=Incenting investments on previously redlined neighborhoods.
Purpose: Examine the role of real estate agents in US redlining, reverse red lining and greenlining.

Home ownership not only provides shelter, but it provides access to resources such as schools, transportations, jobs, faith communities, and sustenance,
 Real Estate agents are the gateways to these communities with homes of higher equity that offer higher education, entrepreneurship and extended …

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The Black Agenda Cincinnati 2016 on 91.7 WVXU

June 08, 2016

Former Cincinnati Mayor Dwight Tillery, currently president of the Center for Closing the Health Gap, is organizing the Black Agenda Cincinnati  summit to look at and develop solutions for challenges facing the African-American community. The day-long summit will be held June 11 at Woodward High School. Click here to hear the full interview with Dwight Tillery.

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How Cincinnati Shapes up on Life-expectancy

June 02, 2016

 

How Cincinnati Shapes up on Life-expectancy

Chetty, R., Stepner, M., Abraham, S., Lin, S., Scuderi, B., Turner, N., … Cutler, D. (2016). The Association Between Income and Life Expectancy in the United States, 2001-2014.JAMA. doi:10.1001/jama.2016.4226

 

http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2513561

 

This study, led by Raj Chetty, aimed to better understand the relationship between income and life expectancy. Objectives were to measure the relationship between income and life expectancy; trends in life expectancy by income group; geographic variation in life expectancy levels and trends by income group; and factors associated with differences in life expectancy across areas.

 

Methods: Over 1.4 billion …

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Is there a racial ‘care gap’ in medical treatment?

May 25, 2016

 

Is there a racial ‘care gap’ in medical treatment? [Television series episode] (2016, April 5). In PBS (Producer), PBS NEWSHOUR.

 

African Americans are being undertreated for pain due to medical students’ false beliefs about biological differences based on race. This is both a medical and sociological problem as deeply embedded myths in U.S. society about racial difference, especially biological differences between races, affect how patients are being treated.

 

This is both a conscious and unconscious stereotype. Societal myths do greatly impact medical student perspectives but these racial distinctions …

[ Read More → ]

Other factors include societal racism that leads to poorer housing, education, nutrition, and unsafe neighborhoods

May 24, 2016

 

Title:   Other factors include societal racism that leads to poorer housing, education, nutrition, and unsafe neighborhoods.

Universal Health Care Action Network. http://uhcanohio.org/content/health-equity

 

Social Determinants of health: Education and Income are major players.  Disparities in non- completion of high school and poverty do exist.  Income disparity in non-completion of high school was greatest for those with family income below the national poverty level.  Percentage of those with disabilities who did not complete high school was about double that of adults without disabilities.  The proportion of those …

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Hospitals Eye Community Health Workers To Cultivate Patients’ Successes

April 28, 2016

 

Luthra, S. L. (2016, April 11). Hospitals Eye Community Health Workers To Cultivate Patients’ Successes. Kaiser Health News.

Retrieved from http://khn.org/news/hospitals-eye-community-health-workers-to-cultivate-patients-successes/

 

The beginning of this article focuses on Donnie Missouri, age 58. Years ago he started his career with Johns Hopkins Hospital in the linens department and is now tasked with connecting hospital patients with resources like housing, transportation and other government benefits — factors that influence health but aren’t the doctor’s focus.

 

What’s Missouri’s secret? It’s a combination of building rapport, meeting patients at home and, most importantly, understanding the challenges …

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How Far Have We Come in Reducing Health Disparities? Progress Since 2000: Workshop Summary; 4/27/16

April 27, 2016

 

How Far Have We Come in Reducing Health Disparities? Progress Since 2000: Workshop Summary.

Institute of Medicine (US).

Washington (DC): National Academies Press (US); 2012.

 

Challenges to addressing health equity:

Effects of current economic downturn cannot be underestimated.  Perceptions that the US is in a post-racial state is false.

 

Study found that doing a paired test-one white and one Latino or African American- matched on personality, clothing, education and more- the tester of color received poorer treatment on average when applying for jobs or mortgages.

Another study found that, doing the …

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Colorectal cancer (CRC); 4/26/16

April 26, 2016

 

Colorectal cancer (CRC)

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27034811

Jackson S. Christian, Oman Matthew, Patel M. Aatish, Vega J. Kenneth. Health Disparities in colorectal cancer among racial ethnic minorities in the United States. Journal of Gastrointestinal Oncology. 2016 April 7; 7(suppl 1): s32-s43.

2010 census: 1/3 US population-indentified as something other than non-Hispanic white.

Incidence and moratlity disparities remain among African Americans and whites.  CRC mortality for whites has decreased the most compared to all other races. Decreased in African Americans as well, but still higher than all other races.  Biggest disparity is …

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ask the doctor

April 26, 2016

2015 HIPPA form for doctors offices   Physician Follow-Up Instructions 4 21 15            Ask the Doctor Form

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Most frequent health disparities in Cincinnati: heart/cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity/overweight, hypertension, and HIV/AIDS; 4/25/16

April 25, 2016

 

Title: Most frequent health disparities in Cincinnati: heart/cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity/overweight, hypertension, and HIV/AIDS.

Others include: arthritis, asthma, cancer (breast, cervical, colon/colorectal, lung, and prostate), chronic kidney disease, glaucoma, infant mortality, influenza and pneumonia, stroke, substance abuse/chemical dependency (alcohol, smoking), and violence.

 

Key factors that can contribute to minority health conditions:

1)      Low priority of preventative care because of:

a)      competing priorities like employment, food, shelter, and feeling loved;

b)     scarcity of culturally relevant health information;

c)      denial of vulnerability;

d)      delays in seeking care;

e)      decreased access …

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REUTERS: Black patients may do better at hospitals with more racial diversity; 4/13/16

April 13, 2016

 

REUTERS: Black patients may do better at hospitals with more racial diversity

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-race-diversity-outcomes-idUSKCN0WW2D8?linkId=22915488

This article from Reuters Health explores cultural competency in hospitals. The article cites a study of outcomes for common gastrointestinal problems in relation to recovery factors in patients of color. Nationwide hospital data found overall black people were 19 percent more likely to die or experience serious complications than white patients. However this study suggests that doctors may do a better job of caring for minorities when they routinely see patients from a …

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Futurity.org: Fewer Infant Deaths for every month of pain maternity leave; 4/12/16

April 12, 2016

 

Futurity.org: Fewer Infant Deaths for every month of pain maternity leave

http://www.futurity.org/healthier-babies-when-moms-take-longer-maternity-leave/

Infant mortality can be reduced by 13 percent for each additional month of paid maternity leave according to this article. A study published in PLOS Medicine recognizes that countries where the majority of infant and maternal deaths, provide less than 12 weeks of paid leave to new mothers. Paid maternity leave policies are a potential instrument for reducing preventable child deaths. The article lists several theories as to why paid and extended maternity leave may …

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REUTERS: Black patients may do better at hospitals with more racial diversity; 4/7/16

April 07, 2016

 

REUTERS: Black patients may do better at hospitals with more racial diversity

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-race-diversity-outcomes-idUSKCN0WW2D8?linkId=22915488

This article from Reuters Health explores cultural competency in hospitals. The article cites a study of outcomes for common gastrointestinal problems in relation to recovery factors in patients of color. Nationwide hospital data found overall black people were 19 percent more likely to die or experience serious complications than white patients. However this study suggests that doctors may do a better job of caring for minorities when they routinely see patients from a …

[ Read More → ]

Futurity.org: Fewer Infant Deaths for every month of pain maternity leave; 4/6/16

April 06, 2016

 

Futurity.org: Fewer Infant Deaths for every month of pain maternity leave

http://www.futurity.org/healthier-babies-when-moms-take-longer-maternity-leave/

Infant mortality can be reduced by 13 percent for each additional month of paid maternity leave according to this article. A study published in PLOS Medicine recognizes that countries where the majority of infant and maternal deaths, provide less than 12 weeks of paid leave to new mothers. Paid maternity leave policies are a potential instrument for reducing preventable child deaths. The article lists several theories as to why paid and extended maternity leave may …

[ Read More → ]

REUTERS: Black patients may do better at hospitals with more racial diversity; 4/4/16

April 04, 2016

 

REUTERS: Black patients may do better at hospitals with more racial diversity

This article from Reuters Health explores cultural competency in hospitals. The article sites a study of outcomes for common gastrointestinal problems in relation to recovery factors and patients of color. Nationwide hospital data found overall black people were 19 percent more likely to die or experience serious complications than white patients. However this study suggests that doctors may do a better job of caring for minorities when they routinely see patients from a broad …

[ Read More → ]

Kaiser Permanente: My Kids is Sick Again – Tips for Keeping Kids Healthy; 3/29/16

March 29, 2016

 

Kaiser Permanente: My Kids is Sick Again – Tips for Keeping Kids Healthy

 

This time of year is when children tend to get sick because of the transition from Winter to Spring. Young children typically catch a cold or a virus up to 8-12 times per year. This seems like a lot, but children are constantly exposed to different environments and it is important to know how to keep them as healthy as possible. Kaiser Permanente put together a list of 8 tips on how to …

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Huffington Post: 9 Simple Tips to Keep Your Mood Up (Even When Everything Goes Wrong); 3/28/16

March 28, 2016

 

Huffington Post: 9 Simple Tips to Keep Your Mood Up (Even When Everything Goes Wrong)

 

We all have those weeks where it seems like the world is out to get us and nothing seems to go right. During these times, it can be difficult to stay positive and look on the bright side of the situation. The Huffington Post put together a list of 9 tips on how to keep your mood up during tough situations to prevent increased stress.

 

Click Here to Learn More.

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Nonprofit Organization Brings Good Nutrition to People ‘Where They Are’; 3/32/16

March 23, 2016

Nonprofit Organization Brings Good Nutrition to People ‘Where They Are’

So what about those of us who cannot shell out big bucks for solid nutritional advice? Cincinnati’s Center for Closing the Health Gap is one local nonprofit organization trying to bring good nutrition to the people who need it most.

The Health Gap focuses its efforts on lower-income communities — African-Americans, Hispanics, Latinos and Appalachian communities in the Tri-State — according to Renee Mahaffey Harris, the Health Gap’s chief operating officer.

Click for the full article: http://bit.ly/1pXC55F

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Huffington Post: The Best 10 Nutrition Tips from Registered Dietitian Nutritionists; 3/22/16

March 22, 2016

 

Huffington Post: The Best 10 Nutrition Tips from Registered Dietitian Nutritionists

 

March is National Nutrition Month, so it is important to catch up on how you can make your eating habits healthier in order to maintain a healthy body and prevent illness or disease. Dietitians are “food experts” that have received a bachelor’s degree in nutrition and are nationally trained and certified.

 

After 10 dietitians were interviewed, the following 10 tips on nutrition were collected:

Eat more whole plants
Combine your food
Make time to each with those you love
Have …

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Kaiser Permanente: Kaiser Permanente Colorado Provides $1 Million to Combat Food Insecurity; 3/21/16

March 21, 2016

 

 

Kaiser Permanente: Kaiser Permanente Colorado Provides $1 Million to Combat Food Insecurity

 

Hundreds of thousands of people in Denver, Colorado are affected by hunger, regardless of race, gender, or which zip code they live in. Kaiser Permanente is making a commitment to decreasing the rates of hunger by providing 13 nonprofit organizations $1 million through a grant. This grant is created to increase enrollment in SNAP and increase healthy food access to low-income children throughout the summer.

 

http://share.kaiserpermanente.org/article/kaiser-permanente-colorado-provides-1-million-to-combat-food-insecurity/

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Huffington Post: 6 Ways to Get Leaner, Stronger and Healthier this Spring; 3/18/16

March 18, 2016

 

Huffington Post: 6 Ways to Get Leaner, Stronger and Healthier this Spring

 

The long-awaited spring season is finally here and many are ready to kick-start the season with more sunshine and activity. Now that the winter gloom is fading, spring is here and it is the ideal time to start making changes to your lifestyle through healthier habits to become leaner or stronger. The Huffington Post came up with a list of 6 ways to get leaner, stronger, and healthier this spring.

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/gaye-groover-christmus/6-ways-to-get-leaner-stronger-and-healthier-this-spring_b_9405264.html?utm_hp_ref=healthy-living

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Regular Soap Just as Effective

March 16, 2016

 

Regular Soap Just as Effective

More research is helping to support the claim that regular soap is just as effective as anti-bacterial soaps. A recent study in Korea tested regular and anti-bacterial soaps against 20 strains of bacterial in a laboratory setting and on people’s hands. The Mayo Clinic wants to support this research as their infectious disease specialists believe the amount of unnecessary use of antibacterial soaps contributes to a global problem of antibiotic resistance.

http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/discussion/antibacterial-soap-no-more-effective-at-killing-germs-than-is-soap/?linkId=22001548

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9 Telemedicine Tools Set to Transform Health Care

March 15, 2016

 

9 Telemedicine Tools Set to Transform Health Care

 

AARP put together a list of tools that are transforming health care. Many people already use cellphones as a reliable resource, even for Telemedicine. Telemedicine through use of computer or cellphone connects Doctors and Patients who are not in the same location. The uses examined in this article include a phone app that can identify skin cancer.

http://www.aarp.org/health/conditions-treatments/info-2016/telemedicine-health-medical-iphone-apps.html?cmp=SNO-ICM-TW-AO&socialid=389380422#slide1

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How McDonald’s turned children into early collectors — and consumers

March 14, 2016

 

How McDonald’s turned children into early collectors — and consumers

Could McDonald’s be phasing out the toy in the Happy Meal? This article explores how McDonalds advertising turned children in to early consumers of unhealthy foods. In recent years the tiny plastic toys have come under scrutiny from healthy eating advocates and parents. The article explains the backlash and banning of toys in certain markets and the future of food marketing aimed at children.

http://www.uconnruddcenter.org/the-past-present-and-future-of-happy-meal-toys

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What’s Working to Help Kids Across America Eat Healthy?

March 11, 2016

 

What’s Working to Help Kids Across America Eat Healthy?

 

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundations announced a new funding opportunity that will support research in underserved Native Americans and Asian Pacific Islander populations. The goal is to incorporate healthy foods in school lunches that are indigenous to the Navajo culture. 2.6 million  will be made available through the Health Eating Research (HER) fund because the RWJF believes such studies can drive progress.

http://www.rwjf.org/en/culture-of-health/2016/03/what_s_working_tohe.html

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TIME: U.S. Task Force recommends screening all overweight adults for Diabetes Risk; 11/5/15

November 05, 2015

 

TIME: U.S. Task Force recommends screening all overweight adults for Diabetes Risk

Adults between ages 40-70 who are overweight or obese are recommended to be screened for abnormal blood sugar. It’s a way to lower the risk of developing heart diseases and Type 2 Diabetes which are more common in the African American community. Here, at The Center for Closing the Health Gap, we have the DoRight! Win Against Diabetes Series and Nutrition Train the Trainer Series that can be beneficial for educating and getting you …

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NPR: Some Health Plans have no In-Network Doctors in key Specialties; 11/4/15

November 04, 2015

 

NPR: Some Health Plans have no In-Network Doctors in key Specialties

The Affordable Care Act requires that health insurance plans have enough doctors in their networks to ensure that their customers can get the health care they need. However, patients may find themselves facing big medical bills for care they thought they had bought insurance to cover. Researchers reviewed 135 health plans in the 34 states that sell health insurance through the federal marketplace and found that 19 of them lacked in-network specialists in some areas. …

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TIME: How your Diet in Childhood can affect you for Life; 11/3/15

November 03, 2015

 

TIME: How your Diet in Childhood can affect you for Life

Most Americans tend to pick up healthy eating habits when they’re well into middle age. At that point they’re already likely on the way toward a number of chronic health conditions including obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and/or high blood pressure. Data in this article highlights how important it is to start healthy eating habits early—not only because they tend to stick around through adulthood, but also because they can actually make a difference in the …

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TIME: How race influences why people die in America; 11/2/15

November 02, 2015

 

TIME: How race influences why people die in America

There is good news to come from the latest analysis on the death rate of Americans. It has decreased by 43% from 1969 to 2013. However, death rates from heart disease, stroke and diabetes are starting to flatten after continuous declines. Researchers speculate the obesity epidemic to be the reason for this. Obesity and its effect on our health needs to be addressed more aggressively, while gaps among different racial and ethnic groups stresses the importance of …

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NPR: Online Health Tools might not help the people who need it Most; 10/30/15

October 30, 2015

 

NPR: Online Health Tools might not help the people who need it Most

More and more digital technology is being utilized in the health care system.  However, a study shows that patients who are poor, black, older, unmarried or on Medicare or Medicaid are less likely to use an electronic health record portal to manage their chronic kidney disease. When patients are unaware of their lab results, it may lead to further complications such as increased risk for high blood pressure, heart attack, and stroke. Although …

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Healthy Black Men: Make it a better Doctor Visit; 10/29/15

October 29, 2015

 

Healthy Black Men: Make it a better Doctor Visit

How many times have you been to the doctor’s office, been poked and prodded, leaving with a prescription, only to recall all of the things you didn’t ask? Or maybe something the doctor said you did not quite understand? You can take an active role in your medical care and treatment by listening closely to your doctor and taking notes if need be, doing your own research, communicating effectively, and learning treatment options. This article puts emphasis/gives …

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NPR: There were fewer Black Men in Medical School in 2014 than in 1978; 10/28/15

October 28, 2015

 

NPR: There were fewer Black Men in Medical School in 2014 than in 1978

While more black men graduated from college over the past few decades, the number of black men applying to medical school has dropped. In 1978, 1,410 black men applied to medical school and 542 ended up enrolling. In 2014, those numbers were down — 1,337 applied and 515 enrolled. Oviea Akpotaire and Jeffrey Okonye share their story of being 2 out of the 5 African American men at their school, and their …

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NPR: Are You Hungry? Pediatricians add a new question during Checkups; 10/27/15

October 27, 2015

 

NPR: Are You Hungry? Pediatricians add a new question during Checkups

An estimated 7.9 million kids in the U.S. live in “food-insecure” households. Yet, when these kids go to the doctor for a checkup, or a well-child visit, the signs of malnutrition are not always apparent. Some families may shy away from showing any sort of struggle, so doctors are recommended to ask. Families using food stamps may receive the same calorie intake as a higher income family, but the food tends to be starchier rather …

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CNN: Kid Couch Potatoes may Face Health Risks; 10/23/15

October 23, 2015

Telling children to sit still might be exactly the wrong message to give. Long periods of inactivity could cause changes in blood circulation even in young children, which may increase risk of heart disease later in life. This article outlines a study on girls 10 years old and younger on their changes in circulation and blood flow after spending 3 hours sitting while watching TV or playing on an iPad. The concern is that if children make a habit of being inactive, then their arteries …

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Rudd Center: Dietary Quality of Americans by Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Participation Status; 10/22/15

October 22, 2015

The SNAP program is designed to reduce food insecurity in the U.S.  While the SNAP program does well at this, it does not help participants meet key dietary guidelines. Future policies should ensure that proper diet quality is addressed along with reducing food insecurity.  Prior research found that consumption of meats, added sugars, and total fats increased with the SNAP program, but there was no effect on participants’ daily intake of fruits, vegetables, grains, or dairy products. Compared to income-eligible non participants, SNAP participants are …

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NPR: Hispanics May Think They Can’t Get Skin Cancer, But They’re Wrong; 10/21/15

October 21, 2015

Hispanic Americans are more likely than other Americans to be diagnosed with skin cancer in its later stages, when it’s more likely to be fatal. Although Hispanics aren’t the most effected population to be diagnosed with melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, 26 percent of Hispanic patients with melanoma aren’t diagnosed until the cancer has progressed to the late stages, compared to 16 percent of Caucasian patients. That vastly increases their risk of death. One reason is the misconception that people with darker skin …

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CDC: Breastfeeding Support Improves in Many U.S. Hospitals; 10/20/15

October 20, 2015

With the infant mortality rate so high more so in the African American population, many hospitals are pushing to see the success rate of mothers continuing breastfeeding so that every newborn has the best possible start in life. Breastfeeding has immense health benefits for babies and their mothers.  Breastfed babies have reduced risks for ear, respiratory, stomach and intestinal infections as well as a lower risk of asthma, obesity, and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Breastfeeding also protects pre-term infants whom are at a higher …

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Kaiser Permanente: A Prescription to Move: Three Ways Health Care Providers Can Promote Active Living; 10/19/15

October 19, 2015

Only 50% of Americans meet the recommended 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity per week. The Kaiser Permanente Institute for Health Policy and American College of Sports medicine have developed three different strategies to take place in their Prescription to move campaign. This campaign has been developed for health care leaders to promote physical activity and to shape environments that support active living. The three strategies are: (1) having a conversation about the importance of fitness; (2) designing active health care environments; (3) investing in …

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Huffington Post: 9 Foods This Nutritionist Stocks in Her Kitchen; 10/16/15

October 16, 2015

Environment plays a huge factor in our food choices. The more junk food we tend to have in our household, the more junk food we eat. To make healthier food choices, stocking up the kitchen with healthy foods is a great way to start. This forces us to make more nutritious food choices. Here are a few examples of the foods  Dr. Lisa Young keeps stocked in her kitchen are:

Greek yogurt

Contains protein, calcium, and good bacteria called probiotics.

Almonds

Contains protein, vitamin E, heart-healthy fats, along with …

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Huffington Post: Breast Cancer, Diet and Healthy Living: Putting All the Pieces Together; 10/15/15

October 15, 2015

This Breast Cancer Awareness Month, it’s important to know what you can do to reduce your risk of developing breast cancer. The key to reducing your cancer risk is to maintain a healthy lifestyle which means exercising regularly, increasing your consumption of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and beans, decreasing the amount of red meat and high-fat dairy products you eat, decreasing your alcohol consumption, and increasing your physical activity.

To Learn More, Click Here.

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Huffington Post: Study: How Long You Wait To See A Doctor Is Linked To Race, Employment; 10/14/15

October 14, 2015

A new study reveals that people of color, people with less education, and those who are unemployed spend more time in clinics overall, including waiting to be seen by a physician than white patients do. The study showed that on average white patients spend a total of 80 minutes in a clinic while Hispanic patients spend on average a total of 105 minutes. The research also found that people of color, the unemployed, and people with less education travel farther to receive healthcare than other …

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Huffington Post: Massive Review Of 58 Studies Confirms Serving Size’s Effect On Diet; 10/13/15

October 13, 2015

A recently released study out of the University of Cambridge in Great Britain has confirmed that people eat larger portion sizes when food comes in larger packages or when food is served on larger dishes. The researchers analyzed data from 6,000 participants in 58 studies and found that when given smaller containers of food, smaller dishes, and even smaller utensils, adults in the U.K. ate 16% less calories and adults in the U.S. ate 29% less calories.

To Learn More, Click Here.

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The Washington Post: Therapists say African Americans are increasingly seeking help for Mental Illness; 10/12/15

October 12, 2015

For many African Americans, the topic of mental illness has carried particularly negative connotations. Due to circumstances such as slavery, the Tuskegee experiment, and relying more on faith, some say it is a matter of distrust and self-reliance, religion versus therapy. In 2008, Caucasians received mental health treatment or counseling at nearly twice the rate of African Americans, and also received prescription medication for mental health-related issues at more than twice the rate of African Americans, according to the 2010 National Healthcare Disparities Report. However, …

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CBS News: Childhood stress linked to heart trouble later in life; 10/9/15

October 09, 2015

A study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology found that experiencing periods of distress during childhood increases the risk of heart issues developing later in life. The research team led by Ashley Winning of the T.H. Chan School of Public Health at Harvard University analyzed data collected from 7,000 individuals in Great Britain over the course of 45 years. The research revealed that participants who’d experienced persistent stress in childhood were at a greater risk in middle age of developing heart …

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Reducing screen time is important for our children’s health; 10/7/15

October 07, 2015

Each day new reports come out about the state of children’s health in the United States. Over the past few months, we’ve seen reports that say childhood obesity rates remain the same for children overall, they are increasing for minority children. We’ve seen reports that children and teens are still eating too much fast food and drinking too many sugary beverages. More recently, studies have been published by The University of Connecticut’s Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity showing that children, minority children especially …

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Huffington Post: Why Our Approach to Suicide Prevention Needs to Change Now; 10/7/15

October 06, 2015

Data shows that 2013 was the tenth year in a row of increasing suicide rates in America. Suicide alone is the 10th leading cause of death in America and 3rd leading cause of death in youth. Most prevention has been advocating the public to “recognize the signs” and refer that person to appropriate help. The reality is that the majority of public is unaware and many mental health professionals are inadequately trained. It is believed that trauma and adverse childhood experiences are highly prevalent in …

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CBS News: Little sign of improvement in U.S. obesity rates

October 05, 2015

New data form an annual phone survey shows reveals that obesity rates for adult Americans are not declining. The results of the survey revealed that 68.6% of American adults are either overweight or obese. The data also found that while most states’ obesity rates remained relatively the same, five states, Ohio, Utah, New Mexico, Minnesota, and Kansas saw small increases in their obesity rates.

To Learn More, Click Here.

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PolicyLink: Healthy Food Access Portal; 10/2/15

October 02, 2015

Policy Link has created an interactive map in order to view and describe details of communities around the world. Such features include categories of Health, People, Food Access, Grocery Retail Locations, and many others. It is quite the reality check and provides education on important subject areas when it comes to living a healthy lifestyle. Just by entering in a zip code, state, or roaming around the globe can bring your own health as well as the health of your community into perspective.

 

To Learn More, …

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NBC News: Black Kids Get Less Medication than White Kids in ER; 10/1/15

October 01, 2015

Researchers used national survey data from 2003-2010, covering more than 900,000 children with acute appendicitis to explore this claim. They found that only 57% of kids got pain medication, 41% being an opioid drug typically prescribed for appendicitis. Of that 41%, only 12% of African American children received that drug. This suggests that doctors may be recognizing pain levels equally, but treating patients differently by giving African American children a less effective drug, if any at all. These findings are part of a longstanding problem …

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Time: How Much Exercise Each Week Does it Take to Prevent Breast Cancer?; 9/30/15

September 30, 2015

Over one hundred studies have shown that physical activity lowers the risk of breast cancer in women. More active women are less likely to develop breast cancer than less active women. In a new year-long study, researchers compared women who exercised 150 minutes a week to women who exercised 300 minutes a week. The group who exercised 300 minutes a week lost more body and abdominal fat, an important find since fat levels have been linked to higher risk of cancers such as breast cancer. …

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Huffington Post: Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally/ 9/28/15

September 28, 2015

 

Huffington Post: Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally/ 9/28/15

New studies have shown that for those with high blood pressure, their goal should be to lower their blood pressure to 120 mm Hg in order to greatly reduce the risk of heart disease and cardiovascular related deaths. While medications may be necessary to reduce blood pressure, there are also non-medical interventions that can help to lower your blood pressure. Some ways to reduce your blood pressure include: reducing your salt intake, increasing your fruit and vegetable consumption, …

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Huffington Post: Blacks Still Fare Worse Than Whites After A Heart Attack, Even If They’re Rich; 9/27/15

September 27, 2015

 

Huffington Post: Blacks Still Fare Worse Than Whites After A Heart Attack, Even If They’re Rich; 9/27/15

A recently published study in Circulation found that life expectancy after a heart attack is shorter for African-Americans regardless of socioeconomic status. In comparison, the study found that for whites there was a marked difference in life expectancy after a heart attack with more affluent individuals living longer than less wealthy individuals.

To Learn More, Click Here.

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CBS News: Many U.S. kids eat fast food every day; 9/26/15

September 26, 2015

 

CBS News: Many U.S. kids eat fast food every day; 9/26/15

The Center for Disease Control has released a new report revealing that nearly one-third of American children are eating fast food or pizza every day. While the percentage of American children consuming fast food daily has stayed mostly the same since the 1990’s, it is still a cause for concern. The report also shows that African-American and Hispanic children are receiving 12 percent of their daily calories from fast foods that are high in sodium, …

[ Read More → ]

NPR: Most People On Food Stamps Eat Less Nutritious Food Than Everyone Else; 9/25/15

September 25, 2015

 

NPR: Most People On Food Stamps Eat Less Nutritious Food Than Everyone Else; 9/25/15

A new review out of the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity has found that those receiving SNAP benefits have a less healthy diet than those of higher incomes who do not receive food stamps. The review of studies published between 2003 and 2014 found that recipients of SNAP benefits ate few fruits vegetables and whole grains than individuals with higher incomes and consumed more added sugars than those with higher …

[ Read More → ]

NPR: Most People On Food Stamps Eat Less Nutritious Food Than Everyone Else; 9/24/15

September 24, 2015

 

NPR: Most People On Food Stamps Eat Less Nutritious Food Than Everyone Else; 9/24/15

A new review out of the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity has found that those receiving SNAP benefits have a less healthy diet than those of higher incomes who do not receive food stamps. The review of studies published between 2003 and 2014 found that recipients of SNAP benefits ate few fruits vegetables and whole grains than individuals with higher incomes and consumed more added sugars than those with higher …

[ Read More → ]

Harvard Health Blog: Mild high blood pressure in young adults linked to heart problems later in life; 9/23/15

September 23, 2015

 

Harvard Health Blog: Mild high blood pressure in young adults linked to heart problems later in life; 9/23/15

A new study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology has found that young adults with slightly raised blood pressure could be at risk for heart disease later in life. The study followed 2500 men and women between the ages of 18-30 over a 25 year time period. Each participant was screened seven times over that time. Researchers found that those who’d exhibited raised blood …

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We need more African-American physicians; 9/18/15

September 18, 2015

In every program and initiative that we lead at The Health Gap we strive to empower and engage our community members so that they can become advocates for their health and the health of their communities. Whether they learn about nutrition and healthy eating choices, how to manage a chronic condition, leadership skills, or how to navigate the complex and complicated health care systems, each person we impact walks away with the knowledge and confidence to effectively take control of the health and their lives.

However, …

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Inner City Tennis Project creates new possibilities for our youth; 9/17/15

September 17, 2015

Inner City Tennis Project creates new possibilities for our youth

For almost 30 years, Rachel Fair, Tony Pack, and Lt. Denise Carpenter have helped Cincinnati’s youth find their strengths, passions, and confidence through the sport of tennis. Originally running as a six week long summer tennis program offered by the Cincinnati Recreation Center, the Inner City Tennis Project (ICTP) has grown beyond a once yearly, six week program into an entity of its own providing tennis instruction, fitness education, and nutrition education to our youth in …

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CBS News: Surgeon General: Make walking a national health priority; 9/17/15

September 17, 2015

The U.S. Surgeon General has launched the “Step It Up” campaign to promote walking and physical activity in wheelchairs as a way to combat obesity and obesity related disease in the U.S. The call to action issued by the Surgeon General highlights the latest data showing the half of American adults are living with conditions such as heart disease, diabetes, and cancers. Part of this campaign also urges community planners, city planners, and government agencies to create walking friendly communities.

To Learn More, Click Here.

 

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Eating healthy on a budget; 9/16/15

September 16, 2015

With all the coverage obesity gets in the news, it is easy to assume that people would be jumping at the opportunity to purchase fresh fruits and vegetables and to cut out unhealthy processed foods that are can contribute to unhealthy weight gain. However, for those who are living on tight budgets, the idea that healthy eating is too expensive becomes an obstacle to creating healthy food choices.

This idea that healthy eating is too expensive is bolstered by the heavy presence of fast food restaurants …

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Huffington Post: What Women Don’t Know About Stroke Could Kill Them; 9/16/15

September 16, 2015

Did you know that women and men experience strokes differently from one another? Research from The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center found that just 11% of women can identify risk-factors for strokes and that many view strokes as an “men’s health issue” even though strokes are the third leading killer of women in the U.S. Women’s stroke symptoms include: dizziness, headaches, hiccups, chest pain, and numbness.

To Learn More, Click Here.

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Huffington Post: NYC Will Be the First to Require Salt Warnings On Restaurant Menus; 9/15/15

September 15, 2015

New York City has become the first city in the United States to require chain restaurants to indicate on their menus when items contain more than the recommended daily limit of sodium which is 2,300mg or one tablespoon per day. This requirement was voted upon unanimously by the New York City Board of Health resulting in these restaurants placing salt shaker icons next to high sodium items.

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Policy Link: Lack of Proper Access to Food Costs the Health Care System; 9/14/15

September 14, 2015

A study done in Canada showed that people, who reported having trouble getting food on the table, used health care services more often. The message is that food disparities within households are able to predict the overall health and health care costs. It is also mentioned that income, educational level, and homeowner status are a part of the issue as well. About 12.6% of households reported worrying about not being able to feed their families. This puts pressure on families and individuals, forcing the purchases …

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Huffington Post: Food Insecure Children Are More Likely To Be Obese; 9/11/15

September 11, 2015

A new study published in the Journal of the American Osteopathic Association reveals the connection between food insecurity and adolescent obesity. This study of 7,000 adolescents ages 12-18 found that for those who live in areas of food insecurity, adolescents were 33% to 44% more likely to be overweight and 1.5 times more likely to be obese than those who lived in areas of food security.

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Science Daily: Body Fat Can Send Signals To Brain, Affecting Stress Response; 9/10/15

September 10, 2015

It has been well established that the brain affects other parts of the body, but researchers at the University of Florida have found that body fat is able to do the same. The underlying cause is stress, which increases the desire to eat more, thus increasing the risk of obesity. Too much fat impairs the body’s ability to send signals properly to the brain in order to stop the stress response. It is a vicious cycle: stress leads to overeating, people become obese, which may …

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NBC News: Half of Americans Have Diabetes or High Blood Sugar, Survey Finds; 9/9/15

September 09, 2015

New research shows that nearly one half of all American adults have diabetes or staggeringly high blood sugar levels. The report from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases analyzed survey data from 5,000 people finding that the prevalence of diabetes in the black, Asian, and Hispanic communities is twice that of the white community.

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Time: How Soda Affects Kids’ Cholesterol Levels; 9/8/15

September 08, 2015

 

Time: How Soda Affects Kids’ Cholesterol Levels

A new study published in the Journal of Nutrition is adding more evidence of how sugary beverages negatively impacts children’s health. The study of about 700 children ages 8-15 analyzed changes in cholesterol based upon changes in the consumption of sugary beverages over the course of a year. The study found that children who drank more sugary beverages during this time had increased bad cholesterol levels and those who drank fewer sugary beverages had high levels of good cholesterol. …

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CBS News: U.S. smoking rate drops to new low; 9/7/15

September 07, 2015

 

CBS News: U.S. smoking rate drops to new low

According to the CDC, Americans are smoking less. New government survey results show that once again the number of American smokers is on the decline. This 2015 data revealed that just 15% of adults say they are current smokers, down two percent from 2014. While these numbers are good, the survey did find that African Americans are smoking at rates higher than whites or Hispanics.

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Washington Post: CDC: Your heart is probably a lot older than you are; 9/4/15

September 04, 2015

 

Washington Post: CDC: Your heart is probably a lot older than you are

The CDC has released a study showing that our hearts are older than our real ages. The study found that for American men, the average heart was 7.8 years older than chronological age and women’s hearts were 5.4 years older than chronological age. The study is more concerning when broken down by race. It shows that for both black men and black women, hearts on average are 11 years older than chronological age. …

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Washington Post: CDC: Your heart is probably a lot older than you are; 9/3/15

September 03, 2015

The CDC has released a study showing that our hearts are older than our real ages. The study found that for American men, the average heart was 7.8 years older than chronological age and women’s hearts were 5.4 years older than chronological age. The study is more concerning when broken down by race. It shows that for both black men and black women, hearts on average are 11 years older than chronological age. The results of this study have begun to shed light on the …

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RWJF: Black and Hispanic Youth Disproportionately Targeted With Advertising for Unhealthy Food and Beverages; 9/2/15

September 02, 2015

According to research conducted by the Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity, the African American Collaborative Obesity Research Network (AACORN) and Salud America!, food companies disproportionately target their TV advertising for fast food, candy, sugary drink, and snack brands to black and Hispanic consumers. These demographics also received less TV advertising for healthier foods such as yogurt, 100 percent juice, and fruits. 48 out of 246 brands were found to disproportionately target their advertisement towards children and teens compared to adults. The same brands …

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CBS News: “Healthy Happy Meals” bill targets childhood obesity; 9/1/15

September 01, 2015

A new bill proposed in New York City’s city council would require fast food restaurants to make their kids’ meal options healthier.  The bill first introduced in 2011 and then re-introduced in 2014 would restrict the amount of calories, added sugars, fat, and sodium in meals that were served with a toy. If passed children’s meals would have to follow these restrictions: meals must be less than 500 calories, meals must have fewer than 35% of those calories from fat, meals would have fewer than …

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NPR: Can Health Care Be Cured Of Racial Bias?; 8/31/15

August 31, 2015

 

NPR: Can Health Care Be Cured Of Racial Bias?

As the overall health of Americans continues to improve, we find that racial disparities in treatment and health care still persist. Many studies have found that unconscious biases continue to inform how physicians treat their patients. A few studies have found evidence that when black patients present with similar pain as white patients, they are often times prescribed less pain medications than the white patients. Similar research has found that when black patients present with chest pain …

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Time: Working Long Hours Could Increase Your Risk of Stroke and Heart Disease; 8/30/15

August 30, 2015

 

Time: Working Long Hours Could Increase Your Risk of Stroke and Heart Disease

New research out of the University College London and published in The Lancet has found that working longs hours increases your risk of heart disease and stroke. The study focused on data of workers who worked a maximum of 55 hours per week and found that for those who worked between 41 and 48 hours per week, there was a 10% increased risk for stroke. For those who worked between 49 and 54 …

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Time: New Study Identifies 9 Risk Factors for Alzheimer’s disease; 8/28/15

August 28, 2015

 

Time: New Study Identifies 9 Risk Factors for Alzheimer’s disease

A recently released study has found that two-thirds of Alzheimer’s cases can be linked to nine mostly preventable risk factors. The research published in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery and Psychiatry analyzed data from 300 studies found that the following most common risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease:

Obesity
Carotid artery narrowing
Low educational attainment
Depression
High blood pressure
Frailty
Smoking
High levels of amino acids
Type 2 diabetes

These nine most common factors mirror the social determinants of health and for the most part are preventable.

To …

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Time: This Is the Worst Kind of Fat for Your Heart; 8/28/15

August 27, 2015

A study recently published in BMJ has found that trans fats are connected to the highest rates of death from all causes, deaths from heart disease, and the development of heart problems. Researchers discovered that those who eat more trans fats in their diets are at a 34 percent higher risk of dying from any cause compared to those who don’t eat trans fats. They found that there is a 28 percent increased risk of dying from heart disease and a 21% increased risk of …

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Huffington Post: Nearly 1 In 5 Children And Teens Are Obese; 8/29/15

August 27, 2015

 

Huffington Post: Nearly 1 In 5 Children And Teens Are Obese

The Center for Disease Control has released new research showing that 17.5% of children and teens ages 3 to 19 are obese. This new data reveals that while the obesity rate for this age group overall has remained static, the obesity rates for minority children in low-income populations has continued to rise over the past decade. Researchers suggest that the consumption of sugar, especially the sugars in sweetened beverages is a contributing factor to this …

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Huffington Post: Eating A Southern Diet Might Raise Your Heart Attack Risk; 8/26/15

August 26, 2015

A new study published in Circulation has found that individuals who frequently eat a “Southern-style” diet, meaning a diet including fatty and fried foods, processed meats, and sugary drinks were at a 56 percent greater risk for heart disease than those who did not eat these foods frequently. The study screened 17,000 individuals who were then given a physical exam and surveyed on their eating habits. The research found that African-American males and individuals who did not graduate from high school were the most likely …

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USA Today: Infant mortality rate hits record low, although racial disparities persist; 8/25/15

August 25, 2015

The Infant Mortality Rate in the United States reached a record low according to recently released data from the National Center for Health Statistics. Since 2005, the infant mortality rate has dropped by 13% overall to 5.96 deaths per 1000 live births. However, the United States still ranks last among 26 high-income countries in the world. While this is good news for the United States overall, the infant mortality for black babies remains high at 11 deaths per 1000 live births and maternal mortality for …

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New York Times: Breast-Feeding’s Heart Benefits; 8/24/15

August 24, 2015

A new study published in Obstetrics and Gynecology found that women who breastfed have a lower risk of cardiovascular disease than women who do not. The research focused on 846 women over a 20 year time period and found that women who did not breastfeed had thicker carotid arteries which increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, than those who did breastfeed. The researchers believe that since pregnancy causes the heart system to work harder thus increasing the risk for heart disease, breastfeeding restores the body …

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Washington Post: Black poverty differs from white poverty; 8/21/15

August 21, 2015

A report for The Century Foundation further solidifies that poverty impacts African Americans differently than it does white Americans. The report which analyzed data from 2009-2013 found that for more than one-third of poor blacks live in areas classified as high-poverty census tracks meaning that more than 40% of the population is poor. The percentage of poor blacks who live in these tracks has worsened since 2000 and stands at 10 times the number of poor whites who live in high-poverty census tracks. The data …

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NBC News: American diet fatal for prostate cancer survivors; 8/19/15

August 19, 2015

 

NBC News: American diet fatal for prostate cancer survivors

A recent study found that the typical western diet may cause prostate cancer survivors to die earlier. This is the most recent finding among an abundance of evidence that Americans’ diets can cause all sorts of diseases.

In a study of men diagnosed with prostate cancer that was not spreading, the men who had more “western” diets, high in refined grains, processed meats, and high-fat dairy were more likely to die in a 10 year period. Men with …

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Huffington Post: The Scary Way Diabetes Affects Thinking Function; 8/18/15

August 18, 2015

 

Huffington Post: The Scary Way Diabetes Affects Thinking Function

There is another reason people should take preventative measures against developing type 2 diabetes or monitor it well; type 2 diabetes has been shown to take a toll on the brain. People with Type 2 diabetes show “a decline in cognitive skills and ability to perform daily activities over the course of two years.” Type 2 diabetes can cause inflammation in the body, including in the brain. This inflammation can cause abnormal blood flow to needed areas …

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CNN: How to Stop Skipping Your Workouts; 8/17/15

August 17, 2015

 

CNN: How to Stop Skipping Your Workouts

Sticking to a fitness routine can be difficult for anyone. Surprises come up in our day to day life that makes our daily workout seem less of a priority. Here are five tips from Michelle Segar, director of Sport, Health and Activity Research and Policy Center at the University of Michigan, to make exercise a part of your everyday life!

“Count everything-and add it up”

Keep track of the little things your do every day such as walking your dog for …

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Time: Here’s Why You Should Take Your Child’s Picky Eating Seriously; 8/16/15

August 16, 2015

 

Time: Here’s Why You Should Take Your Child’s Picky Eating Seriously

Picky eating is common in children and toddlers and is normal – to a certain extent. A new study looked at the eating habits of 917 children who were enrolled in a study on anxiety. Twenty percent of the children were picky eaters and 3% of the children were severely selective eaters. These severely selective eaters are more than twice as likely to be diagnosed with depression or social anxiety. Selective eating may be a …

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CNN: Depression Screening Recommended for Pregnant Women; 8/15/15

August 15, 2015

 

CNN: Depression Screening Recommended for Pregnant Women

A new recommendation calls for more depression screenings during pregnancy and within the first year after giving birth. The screenings consist of a questionnaire that takes between five to ten minutes to complete. The recommendation is based off of data that says one in seven women experience depression during pregnancy of within the first year after giving birth; yet many do not realize it or report it to their doctors. The screening recommendation would make screens for depression …

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NPR: Cheap Eats: A Cookbook For Eating Well On A Food Stamp Budget; 8/14/15

August 14, 2015

Leanne Brown noticed that low-income Americans were eating a lot of processed, unhealthy foods and wanted to do something about it. As a result she decided to create a cookbook to help people on SNAP, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, by writing recipes that anyone could make on a budget of 4$ a day. The cookbook also offers tips when you buy produce at the store, making her recipes very flexible to what a person can afford at the store on any given day. You can …

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New York Times: Costly to Treat, Hepatitis C Quietly Gains in U.S.; 8/14/15

August 14, 2015

Hepatitis C is becoming increasingly popular among intravenous drug users, especially in Appalachia. Hepatitis C can lead to liver failure, cancer, and even death. The disease its self and the side effects are extremely expensive to treat; the cost for the new drugs are so high that Medicaid programs and even private insurers say that even treating a fraction of those infected is breaking the bank. One way health departments are trying to treat the epidemic is by offering a needle exchange program so that …

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CNN: Fatherhood causes weight gain; 8/13/15

August 13, 2015

A new study from the American Journal of Men’s Health found that the average 6-foot-tall man living with his child gained 4.4 pounds after becoming a dad. And even new dads who did not live with their children gained an average of 3.3 pounds. Men of similar age and situation who did not have a child lost an average of 1.4 pounds during the same period.

The study did not reveal the cause for the weight gain, but researchers guess that fatherhood reduces the available time …

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New York Times: Young people addicted to devices; 8/12/15

August 12, 2015

While Internet Addiction is not yet a clinical diagnosis in the US, it may be soon. China has already made this classification and American clinical psychologist say that we give children smart devices as distractions, and kids are not learning how to handle day-to-day pressures and emotions for themselves.

Today, the average child under 8-10 year old spends 8 hours per day with multi-media devices and teenagers spend around 11 hours per day with televisions, computers, tablets and cell phones.

Psychologists worry that children who use technology …

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New York Times: Pets help children manage diabetes; 8/12/15

August 12, 2015

Children with type 1 diabetes often want the independence of managing their own blood-sugar levels, but many forget to check glucose levels often enough. A new study from University of Texas Southwest Medical Center found a possible solution to this issue.

Researchers gave children with type 1 diabetes a fish to keep as a pet. They told the children to feed the fish each morning and night and to check their glucose levels at the same time. After just three months, the children had improved glucose …

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Mayo Clinic: Overcoming barriers to exercise; 8/11/15

August 11, 2015

Everyone knows that exercise is beneficial to our health, but there are a few common reasons people do not exercise as much as they should. Here are a few tips to overcome those common barriers to health:

If you don’t think you have time to exercise, squeeze in some sort of movement throughout the day. Even something as simple as 10 minutes of walking offers benefits. A few ten minute walks throughout the day also add up.
If exercise seems boring, find an activity you like that …

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Mayo Clinic: American adults not eating enough fruits and vegetables; 8/11/15

August 11, 2015

It is difficult to avoid hearing about the benefits of fruits and vegetables in our diets. And yet, a recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that 76 percent of adults do not meet their daily recommended fruit intake and 87 percent did not meet their daily recommended vegetable intake. Adults should be getting 1.5-2 cups of fruit per day and 2-3 cups of vegetables per day.

The Mayo Clinic suggests including a fruit and/or vegetable every time you eat. They …

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New York Times: City living affects mental health; 8/10/15

August 10, 2015

Many Cincinnati residents live in places with limited green space, reducing their exposure to natural scenery. A recent article in the New York Times suggests this may be affecting our mental and physical health. Urban dwellers have higher rates of anxiety, depression and other mental illnesses than those who live outside of city limits.

A study by Stanford University found that even a brief walk through a grass-covered park can increase happiness and attentiveness for the rest of the day. Taking walks like these regularly can …

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CBS News: New moms get conflicting advice on infant care, survey finds; 8/10/15

August 10, 2015

A study was recently conducted to try to determine why there is so much misinformation in relation to infant care. It found that the majority of information mothers receive is inconsistent between medical professionals and friends and family. Many times doctors share correct information with mothers but mothers instead take advice from family members and friends. This advice on sleep position, breastfeeding, pacifier use, and other things can sometimes put the infant at a higher risk. Mothers should be aware of the best practices to …

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New York Times: Stillbirths Now Outnumber Deaths Among Infants; 8/9/15

August 09, 2015

Stillbirths now outnumber deaths among infants before their first birthdays for the first time since such deaths have been recorded and studied. This is good news for infant mortality, as infant mortality has decreased by 11% across the nation in the past nine years. However, little progress has been made toward reducing the number of stillbirths in the United States. The difference between stillbirths and infant deaths was very small (only slightly more than 100 stillbirths than infant deaths), but the difference does note a …

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New York Times: Snoring Children May Suffer From Sleep Apnea; 8/8/15

August 08, 2015

Sleep apnea is a condition usually diagnosed in adults and associated with obesity. It is a sleep disorder in which breathing repeatedly stops and starts, and some of the major symptoms are loud snoring and waking up gasping for air because of a sudden inability to breathe. New studies have come out showing that children who snore may actually have sleep apnea as well. In most cases for children, the airway becomes obstructed by enlarged tonsils, which causes the loud snoring noises. If sleep apnea …

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Time: FDA Wants Nutrition Labels to Include More Detail on Added Sugars; 8/7/15

August 07, 2015

The FDA has proposed a new change for nutrition labels that deal with the amount of added sugars in foods and beverages. It would like nutritional labels to include the amount of added sugar in grams as well as the percent daily value of those added sugars. The argument behind the change is that adding these values to the nutritional label would show buyers how much sugar there is in their food or drink compared to the recommended daily limit on sugar. The recommendation currently …

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Cincinnati Business Courier: These are Cincinnati’s Top-Rated Hospitals;8/6/15

August 06, 2015

U.S. News & World Report released their 2015-16 hospital rankings on July 21, naming the top five hospitals in Greater Cincinnati. At the number one spot was Christ Hospital, followed by Bethesda North Hospital in Montgomery (#2), Good Samaritan Hospital in University Heights (#2), the University of Cincinnati Medical Center in Corryville (#4), and St. Elizabeth Hospital in Edgewood (#5). Christ Hospital was ranked number three last year and number one two years ago, consistently remaining one of the top Greater Cincinnati hospitals. Christ Hospital …

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Huffington Post: 10 Superfoods That Can Help You Achieve More Restful Sleep; 8/5/15

August 05, 2015

Recent studies have found that what we eat affects how we sleep, establishing a clear link between certain foods, nutrients, and sleep quality. Research has shown that some nutrient dense foods contribute to better and more restful sleep, so if you have difficulty sleeping or just want to sleep better, try adding some of these foods into your diet more often. Carrots (canned, raw, juiced, or frozen), Montmorency tart cherry juice, raw walnuts, Greek yogurt, and pumpkin seeds are all on the list. In addition, …

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Cincinnati Enquirer: Working Together For Breastfeeding Success; 8/5/15

August 05, 2015

Ohio Women, Infants, and Children program’s theme for the month of August is “Working Together for Breastfeeding Success.” The Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) program is a supplemental food, nutrition, and breastfeeding support program that provides federal grants to states for low-income women and children who are at nutritional risk. One of the components of the program are the Breastfeeding Peer Helpers, who are available to give pregnant and new mothers information on breastfeeding as well as be an active support system for breastfeeding mothers. …

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RWJF: Making the Grade: An Assessment of the Healthy Weight Commitment; 8/4/15

August 04, 2015

Food manufacturers around the United States are coming together to try to build a better, healthier nation for our youth. Sixteen major food and beverage manufacturers and distributors are trying to target healthy eating and active living to ensure that our youth grow up at a healthy weight. This initiative is going to come together to build a large scale culture for our youth. The members of these companies plan to cut the number of calories they sell to the American public by 1 trillion …

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Huffington Post: Nursing Suite At Cincinnati Reds’ Stadium Is A Home Run For Breastfeeding Moms; 8/4/15

August 04, 2015

A few local places in Cincinnati are breastfeeding friendly and have adapted their facilities to meet the needs of breastfeeding mothers who desire more privacy and better spaces than a public restroom. In March of 2015, the Cincinnati Reds’ stadium opened their Pampers Nursing Suite for mothers. The suite features rocking chairs, a kitchen area with a fridge and sink, changing tables, restrooms, lockers, and toys, as well as televisions that broadcast the game inside. Mothers are still able to breastfeed at their seats in …

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Huffington Post: Five Ways to Support Breastfeeding Moms; 8/3/15

August 03, 2015

In honor of National Breastfeeding Month this August, we want to share five ways for families and friends to support breastfeeding moms. Breastfeeding success is largely dependent on a mother’s support system, so supporting your breastfeeding wife, sister, or friend actually plays a huge role in the baby’s health as well!

Learn about breastfeeding so that you can understand what a breastfeeding mom is going through.
Connect with experts such as doctors, nurses, and breastfeeding counselors to gain helpful tips and great resources.
Take over household responsibilities like …

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Babycenter.com : Diet for a Healthy Breastfeeding Mom;8/3/15

August 03, 2015

It is important for breastfeeding mothers to get the proper amount of nutrients each day in order to have the necessary strength to take care of and feed a new baby. It is common for breastfeeding moms to feel hungrier than usual, since your baby is working overtime to produce energy for you and for your baby in the form of breast milk. In general, breastfeeding moms need about 500 calories more than their usual diet; a good way to get these extra calories is …

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USA Today: Heroin Use Surges, Addicting More Women and Middle-Class; 7/21/15

July 21, 2015

 

USA Today: Heroin Use Surges, Addicting More Women and Middle-Class

A new study released by the CDC (Center for Disease Control) says that heroin use is reaching new communities including women and the middle-class. Heroin addiction can affect anyone. Statistics show that heroin use has grown in more financially secure households. It has grown by 60% in households with an income of at least $50,000 and by 62.5% among people with private insurance. Three-fourths of first time heroin users first became addicted to opiates, before turning …

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New York Times: Screen Addiction is Taking a Toll on Children; 7/20/15

July 20, 2015

 

New York Times: Screen Addiction is Taking a Toll on Children

A study from Kaiser Family Foundation in 2010, found that the average 8-10 year olds spend on average eight hours a day in front of a screen. Teenagers can spend more than 11 hours a day in front of the screen. Cellphones and television are easy ways to distract children from a temper tantrum they may throw, or keep them out of their parent’s hair for the time being. But young children learn best from …

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NPR: More People Quitting Smoking, Do We Need E-Cigarettes?; 7/19/15

July 19, 2015

 

NPR: More People Quitting Smoking, Do We Need E-Cigarettes?

In the United Sates the total number of smokers is on the decline. There is no clear stance on whether e-cigarettes will be successful, as an alternative to get people to quit smoking cigarettes. E-cigarettes are marketed as not as harmful as normal cigarettes. One reason this came about was the common belief that nicotine kept people addicted to cigarettes, therefore e-cigarettes could provide that addicting nicotine to e-cigarette users without the harmful toxins that cigarettes contained. …

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CDC: Three out of four American adults favor making 21 the minimum age of sale for tobacco products; 7/18/15

July 18, 2015

 

CDC: Three out of four American adults favor making 21 the minimum age of sale for tobacco products

The majority of adults are in favor of raising the minimum sale of all tobacco products to 21. Currently in most states the minimum age of the sale for tobacco is 18. In a few states, Alabama, Alaska, New Jersey and Utah the minimum age is 19. In Hawaii the minimum age is already 21. Raising the minimum age to sell tobacco products could delay the age when …

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CDC: Wellness at Work; 7/17/15

July 17, 2015

 

CDC: Wellness at Work

Businesses have realized the importance of an employee’s long-term health as well as the benefits of health promotion in the workplace. A person spends a huge chunk of their day at their workplace, and the type of work you do may have an impact on your chronic health. A study by the CDC showed obesity rates varied by job type. For example 11.6% of doctors and dentists were obese while 38.6% of truck drivers, who spend most of their time sitting while …

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CBS News: Restaurant meals can be as bad for your waistline as fast food; 7/16/15

July 16, 2015

 

CBS News: Restaurant meals can be as bad for your waistline as fast food

We know that eating at fast food joints can be very bad for us, but we are finding that eating out at restaurants can be just as unhealthy. Eating at restaurants makes it easier to take in healthy nutrients and vitamins in comparison to fast food joints. Both restaurants and fast food joints usually result in more sodium and cholesterol intake than the recommended limit. This extra sodium and cholesterol poses a …

[ Read More → ]

Time: 90% of Americans Eat Too Much Salt; 7/15/15

July 15, 2015

 

Time: 90% of Americans Eat Too Much Salt

Researchers have found that more than 90% of Americans eat too much sodium. Consuming excessive amounts of sodium can put one at risk to develop heart problems. We have seen that most Americans claim they are trying to cut back on their sodium intake. The problem is that the majority of these people cutting back are only doing so because medical professions have advised them to. Most of the people cutting back on their sodium intake have been …

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Administration To Pursue Health Savings Accounts Despite Uncertainty Over Federal Approval; 7/14/15

July 14, 2015

 

Administration To Pursue Health Savings Accounts Despite Uncertainty Over Federal Approval

The Kasich administration will seek authority to establish Medicaid health savings accounts under a budget directive even though the proposal’s long-term fate could hinge on federal approval.

The Fiscal Year 2016-2017 spending bill (HB 64), which Gov. John Kasich finalized last week, requires the Medicaid director to seek a federal waiver mandating that all non-disabled adult Medicaid recipients enroll in a health savings account and pay in 2% of their family income up to $99 per …

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Obesity stigma adds obstacle to weight epidemic; 7/14/15

July 14, 2015

 

Obesity stigma adds obstacle to weight epidemic

 

With the consumption of unhealthy foods and increasingly sedentary lifestyles, more than one- third of Americans today are obese. In Cincinnati, the rate of overweight and obese adults is higher than the national average, with 65% of area adults being overweight with rates having risen over 50% in the past 15 years.

 

Unfortunately, the majority of efforts currently used by the media and public health organizations to combat rising obesity levels have encouraged an entirely new public health issue. Weight …

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Time: 90% of Americans Eat Too Much Salt;7/11/15

July 11, 2015

 

Time: 90% of Americans Eat Too Much Salt

Researchers have found that more than 90% of Americans eat too much sodium. Consuming excessive amounts of sodium can put one at risk to develop heart problems. We have seen that most Americans claim they are trying to cut back on their sodium intake. The problem is that the majority of these people cutting back are only doing so because medical professions have advised them to. Most of the people cutting back on their sodium intake have been …

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CBS News: Restaurant meals can be as bad for your waistline as fast food; 7/10/15

July 10, 2015

 

CBS News: Restaurant meals can be as bad for your waistline as fast food

We know that eating at fast food joints can be very bad for us, but we are finding that eating out at restaurants can be just as unhealthy. Eating at restaurants makes it easier to take in healthy nutrients and vitamins in comparison to fast food joints. Both restaurants and fast food joints usually result in more sodium and cholesterol intake than the recommended limit. This extra sodium and cholesterol poses a …

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Rudd Center: WIC Fruit and Vegetable Initiative Proves Successful; 7/9/15

July 09, 2015

 

Rudd Center: WIC Fruit and Vegetable Initiative Proves Successful

In 2009, the US Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) began giving program members vouchers specifically for fruits and vegetables. This revision was made in an effort to increase fruit and vegetable consumption and combat obesity and overweight rates in WIC populations.

A year later, fruit and vegetable purchases were compared and found that total fruit and vegetable purchases increased from 10.0% of household grocery expenditures to 12.5%. Before this revision, WIC benefits did not …

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Bloomberg: How American Obesity Hurts the Economy; 7/8/15

July 08, 2015

 

Bloomberg: How American Obesity Hurts the Economy

As obesity continues to become more and more common in the US (35.7 percent of Americans are obese today, compared to 13.5 in the 1960s), the monetary cost is hitting everyone. Bloomberg magazine estimates that obesity caused $315.8 billion in medical-care in 2010 ($3508 per year for each obese person in the US). That cost only accounts for clinical care.

There are also costs for decreased productivity at work, require more gasoline to get from place to place, as well …

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RWJF: How Childhood Experiences Shape Our Nation’s Health;7/3/15

July 03, 2015

A parent should want more than anything to raise their child in a healthy, safe environment. Recent studies have shown the importance of this up bringing is more important than ever. Researchers found that children who experience childhood trauma are more likely to drop out of school, be incarcerated or chronically unemployed. Aside from this, they also have an increased risk for developing cancer, heart disease and diabetes as an adult. With these studies, a survey was conducted to find that 89 percent of Americans …

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Huffington Post: After Traumatic Event, Women Face Increased Heart Disease Risk; 7/2/15

July 02, 2015

Studies have shown that women who develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have an increased risk for heart disease. Post-traumatic stress disorder is a mental health condition that is triggered by a traumatizing experience in one’s life. Symptoms include flashbacks of the trauma, insomnia and emotional numbness. Researchers found that women with four or more symptoms of PTSD were 60 percent more likely to develop cardiovascular disease. Women who had experiences traumatic events without symptoms of PTSD had a 45 percent increased risk of cardiovascular disease. …

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CBS News: Doctors: Childhood obesity prevention must start sooner; 7/2/15

July 02, 2015

The American Academy of Pediatrics has issued new guidelines regarding childhood obesity that places the focus on preventing childhood obesity and not just treatment of childhood obesity. These new guidelines recommend that pediatricians be trained to be more pro-active with their patients and patients’ families when addressing obesity.

The guidelines make the following recommendations:

Doctors should watch for pre-natal risks of childhood obesity such as smoking while pregnant or if the parents are obese.
Doctors should be aware of early risk factors in infants such as not getting …

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NPR: Take a Hike to do Your Heart and Spirit Good; 7/1/15

July 01, 2015

Walking is the exercise Americans say they engage in most frequently, and the good news is you are getting 95% or more of benefits when you walk compared to jogging according to Dr. Tim Church of Louisiana State.  Lower blood pressure, lower cholesterol, less anxiety and lower risk of diabetes are just some of the health benefits gained when you walk to exercise regularly. Federal health officials recommend 150 minutes of moderate physical activity a week. That is just 30 minutes a day, 5 days …

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NPR: The Challenges Posed By An Aging Global Population; 7/1/15

July 01, 2015

The population around the globe is aging. In Japan, a quarter of the population is 65 years or older, and the United States is heading in a direction where one fifth of the population will be 65 years or older. This is in part due to the fact that people are generally living longer, but also because people are having fewer children. We shouldn’t think of this older population as a burden though, but rather a resource because people are living longer functional lives. There …

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AARP: Brain Health: What Helps, What Hurts; 6/30/15

June 30, 2015

A recent report on brain health issued by the National Academy of Sciences’ Institute of Medicine has good news to tell – Cognitive decline is not inevitable as we age. Things like getting regular exercise, staying socially and intellectually active, and eating a healthy diet are proven to help to preserve your brain health, while some other things may hurt it.

To Learn More, Click Here.

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AARP: Skin Cancer: Don’t Ignore the Signs; 6/30/15

June 30, 2015

Skin cancer statistics are stunning. Every year, 3.5 million skin cancers are diagnosed in the U.S., more than the tally for all other cancers combined. The deadliest form, malignant melanoma, will kill 9,700 people this year; the next deadliest, squamous cell, has increased 200 percent in the past 30 years. The best treatment, of course, is to prevent skin damage in the first place. Be sure to wear sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15 daily. And if you notice any of the American Cancer Society’s …

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New York Times: Supreme Court Allows Nationwide Health Care Subsidies; 6/29/15

June 29, 2015

The Supreme Court reached a decision on Thursday that the health care law commonly known as “Obamacare” can indeed allow the federal government to provide nationwide tax subsidies to help those who cannot afford health insurance premiums on their own. This is the second time in three years that Obamacare has gone up against the Supreme Court and many see this recent victory as a sign that Obamacare is here to stay. Nationwide, 85% of customers using the exchanges qualify for subsidies to help pay …

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Time: Smoking Causes 12 Different Kinds of Cancers; 6/29/15

June 29, 2015

 

Time: Smoking Causes 12 Different Kinds of Cancers

New research published in JAMA International Medicine found that smoking causes almost one-half on cancer deaths from 12 types of cancers that are caused by smoking. The researchers found that smoking was the cause of over 80% of deaths due to lung cancer and over 75% of deaths due to larynx cancers. The study revealed that around 168,000 people in the U.S. die annual to do smoking related cancers.

To Learn More, Click Here.

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AARP: We’re So Lazy. And It’s Getting Worse; 6/29/15

June 29, 2015

 

AARP: We’re So Lazy. And It’s Getting Worse

We all know the importance of being physically active. With the heating advocate for physical activities, Americans are not getting better with it. In fact, we are getting worse regarding getting physical activities. A new survey by the Physical Activity Council (PAC) finds that the number of “totally sedentary” Americans is the highest it’s been since 2007. Roughly 83 million Americans ages 6 and up — about a third of the population — were physically inactive in 2014, …

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Huffington Post: Don’t Ignore These Early Signs Of Heart Disease In Men; 6/27/15

June 27, 2015

 

Huffington Post: Don’t Ignore These Early Signs Of Heart Disease In Men

According to the American Heart Association, heart disease occurs in one in three men in the United States. Because of this, it is important to recognize the early signs of heart disease so that treatment can be sought out immediately. Symptoms for early stages of heart disease include: unexplained pain or tingling in the arm or shoulder, shortness of breath after moderate exercise, and an achiness or squeezing feeling in the chest that can …

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New York Times: How to Eat Healthy Even at Restaurants; 6/26/15

June 26, 2015

 

New York Times: How to Eat Healthy Even at Restaurants

With so many restaurants claiming to adopt healthier practices, it can be difficult to distinguish the truly nutritious from the gimmicks. Here are some tips for eating out to indulge-but not too much:

Eat colorful meals. Typically, food high in nutrients like fruits and vegetables tend to add a lot of color to an otherwise brown plate. A healthy meal should contain 1.5 cups of fruits and vegetables. Eating vegetarian meals, even if you are not vegetarian, …

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CBS News: How much sleep is best for your health?; 6/25/15

June 25, 2015

 

CBS News: How much sleep is best for your health?

The American Thoracic Society has issued new sleep guidelines for adults. The group recommends that adults get 7 to 9 hours of sleep per night to receive the most health benefits from sleeping. Getting adequate sleep is crucial to your health as sleep deprivation has been proven to contribute to a wide range of health issues including hypertension and pre-diabetes and higher mortality rates. The group also notes that sleeping too much each night can contribute …

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Staying safe in the heat

June 24, 2015

Summer is in full swing here in Cincinnati. Schools are out, pools are open, and rising temperatures encourage children and adults to spend more time outdoors in the sunshine. While it is great to enjoy the outdoors, when temperatures reach into the upper 80’s and above, there is an increased chance of health risks which makes it important to know how to stay safe in the sun.

For those who frequently spend extended amounts of time in the heat and sun, knowing the signs and symptoms …

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CNN: Sitting Will Kill You, Even if You Exercise; 6/24/15

June 24, 2015

 

CNN: Sitting Will Kill You, Even if You Exercise

Sitting encompasses the majority of our day for many of us. We sit when we drive to work, sit in front of a computer at work, and sit while watching TV in the evening at home. All this sitting contributes to a sedentary lifestyle and can even outweigh the benefits a person may get from exercising. The World Health Department (WHO) identified physically inactivity, or a sedentary lifestyle, as the fourth-leading risk factor for death. One disturbing …

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The New York Times: Parents’ Denial Fuels Childhood Obesity Epidemic; 6/23/15

June 23, 2015

 

The New York Times: Parents’ Denial Fuels Childhood Obesity Epidemic

More and more parents are turning a blind eye to their child’s weight, even if their weight should be an issue of concern. Researchers compared survey responses in 2012 to a similar survey from 1994. The results showed that children in 2012 are not only heavier but their parents are also having a more difficult time identifying their child’s weight accurately. There are many reasons a child’s weight may go unnoticed; a parents denial, loose …

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RWJF: Lower-Calorie Foods, Beverages Drove Bulk of Supermarket Sales Growth- First Analysis of its Kind; 6/22/15

June 22, 2015

 

RWJF: Lower-Calorie Foods, Beverages Drove Bulk of Supermarket Sales Growth- First Analysis of its Kind

The public’s demand for lower-calorie food options in restaurants has carried over into the supermarket sector.  Hudson Institute reported that lower-calorie foods and beverages drove the bulk of sales growth for supermarket chains between 2009 and 2013. However, this is not the case for foods and beverages that make up most of the calories that children and adolescents consume. Higher calorie items like desserts, pizzas and sugary snacks and drinks make …

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Second Wave Media: Study finds wide racial disparities in infant mortality rates; 6/19/15

June 19, 2015

 

Second Wave Media: Study finds wide racial disparities in infant mortality rates

Despite the fact that the US spends more money on maternal health than any other country, we rank 54th in the world for deaths before the first birthday, or infant mortality (in a ranking of fewest infant deaths). Breaking that statistic up further reveals that there are extreme racial disparities in infant mortality.

The Department of Community Health in Michigan found that in one county, Kalamazoo, infant mortality for black babies was 15.5/1000 born, …

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NPR: Kids aren’t drinking enough water; 6/16/15

June 18, 2015

 

NPR: Kids aren’t drinking enough water

 

A group of Harvard scientists set out to study sugary drink consumption among school-aged children, but their results revealed a new concern. Most children are not drinking enough water every day and according to urine tests, over half of children are at least mildly dehydrated. While mild dehydration does require a hospital visit, but it can affect a child’s mood and learning ability. The Institute of Medicine recommends 1.7 to 3.3 liters of water per day for a child, depending …

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The Health Gap’s Do Right! Health Corner Stores Network was featured on WLWT Channel 5; 6/18/15

June 18, 2015

 

The Health Gap’s Do Right! Health Corner Stores Network was featured on WLWT Channel 5’s nightly broadcast highlighting the work we are doing to increase healthy eating and nutrition education in Cincinnati’s food deserts. Click on the link to view the full story. http://www.wlwt.com/news/the-center-for-closing-the-health-gap-leading-new-mission/33636876

Thank you to our staff, our partners in the Corner Store Network, our Community Health Coaches, and all who help us move towards our goal of building a culture of health in Cincinnati.

Special thanks to Interact for Health who currently funds this …

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Huffington Post: Managing your weight without dieting; 6/18/15

June 18, 2015

 

Huffington Post: Managing your weight without dieting

It seems as if everywhere we look there’s a new diet trend that guarantees weight loss or weight management. It’s easy to get overwhelmed with all of this information. Do you tried the Mediterranean diet or do you go vegan? Which works best? Huffington post contributor Ann Ricci has put together a list of easy tips to follow that don’t require you to fret over which trendy diet you should be following.  Below are some of her suggestions:

People often …

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Time: San Francisco Approves Warning Label for Sugary Drink Ads; 6/17/15

June 17, 2015

 

Time: San Francisco Approves Warning Label for Sugary Drink Ads

In San Francisco, the Board of Supervisors passed three new laws that would cover the entire city. First, soda advertisements on billboards, bus stations, posters, and in stadiums would have to include a warning label. This warning label would say “Drinking beverages with added sugar contributes to obesity, diabetes, and tooth decay.” Second, the city of San Francisco would be banned from spending city money on soda and no soda advertisements could be placed on property …

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Los Angeles Times: California Senate Votes to Raise Smoking Age to 21; 6/17/15

June 17, 2015

 

Los Angeles Times: California Senate Votes to Raise Smoking Age to 21

On June 2, California’s State Senate put to vote and approved a bill that could have a large impact on the movement to reduce smoking by teenagers. The bill raises the minimum age for buying cigarettes and tobacco products to 21 instead of 18. The reasoning behind the bill is that according to some estimates, 90% of tobacco users start smoking before age 21, so banning the legal purchase of cigarettes before that age …

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Health Gap’s Corner Store Taste Testing FREE and OPEN to the public at 2 Locations; 6/17/15 and 6/18/15

June 16, 2015

 

June 17, 2015

The Health Gap is excited to announce that we will be having a taste-testing demonstration at Jet-In_Market from 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm!  Please stop by and try a delicious sample of fruit salad!

Jet-In-Market
1207 Linn St.
Cincinnati, OH  45203
(513) 241-2993
 

June 18, 2015

Interested in trying a refreshing snack?  We will be having another taste-testing demonstration at Fey’s Grocery from 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm! Please stop by and try a delicious sample of fruit salad!

Fey’s Grocery
3441 Beekman St.
Cincinnati, OH  45223
(513) 541-6570
 

Please call (513) 585-9879 with …

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Mayo Clinic: Blow the Pain Away: Breathing Tips to Help Children Relax; 6/16/15

June 16, 2015

 

Mayo Clinic: Blow the Pain Away: Breathing Tips to Help Children Relax

Stress can affect everybody, even the kids. Breathing can be the easiest thing you and your children can try to stay calm. “You don’t need years of meditative practice to benefit from this technique, nor do your children,” says Peggy Decker, M.D., Mayo Clinic Health System pediatrician. “In fact, kids are generally good at embracing this simple relaxation technique.” Deep breathing increases the supply of oxygen to your brain and stimulates the parasympathetic nervous …

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Reuters: E-cigarette usage surges in past year: Reuters/Ipsos poll; 6/16/15

June 16, 2015

 

Reuters: E-cigarette usage surges in past year: Reuters/Ipsos poll

According to a new Reuters/Ipsos poll of over 5,500 Americans, while the use of e-cigarettes is increasing, the use of traditional tobacco products is not decreasing. Of the 5,679 adults polled, 75% of e-cigarette users still smoke traditional products. This same poll discovered that 10% of the American adults now vape (use e-cigarettes) which is nearly four times the amount of users found in the 2013 poll. Surveyed adults also reported that they believe that e-cigarettes will …

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RWJF: The Marketing of Unhealthy Food and Beverages in African-American Communities; 6/15/15

June 15, 2015

 

RWJF: The Marketing of Unhealthy Food and Beverages in African-American Communities

As we try to shape our culture into a culture of health, we have to focus our efforts on understanding why it is that we are so unhealthy. The African American Collaborative Obesity Research Network has been researching the connection between marketing and consuming healthy foods. Throughout this research they found that price was the first priority in their food purchasing decision, where taste, convenience and quality were secondary concerns. After observing low-income African-American shoppers …

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The Huffington Post: 10 Nutritionist-Approved Ways to Eat Healthier At a Barbecue; 6/11/15

June 11, 2015

Summer is finally here! Ready for BBQ parties but worry about the calories, fats and sugars from the mayo-laden side salads, mystery meat hot dogs and greasy potato chips? Trust me; barbecue is not just about meat and you can easily incorporate vegetables and fruits throughout the menu for the day. For example, have you ever tried grilling a piece of fruit like pineapple? Try it! Grilled fruit can be a great dessert as its sweetness provides a delicious and healthy alternative to candy and …

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Time: Study: A 20% “Fat Tax” Would Improve Public Health; 6/11/15

June 11, 2015

 

Time: Study: A 20% “Fat Tax” Would Improve Public Health

Would an additional tax on junk food help fight rising obesity rates? Oliver Mytton and colleagues at the University of Oxford concluded that “fat taxes” could improve public health outcomes, if the tax was significant meaning 20% or higher. A study by Mytton and other colleges found that a 35% additional tax on sugary beverages, or an additional cost of $0.45 per drink led, to a 26% decline in sales. Other studies on higher taxes placed …

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National Iced Tea Day; 6/10/15

June 10, 2015

Today is national iced tea day! Celebrate this day by making your version of a natural iced tea, which can be a healthy beverage choice as long as you do not add sugars or artificial sweeteners. Some good ways to dress up your tea is with fresh fruit, lemon juice, mint leaves, or even honey. For example, you can make delicious peach tea by just adding tea bags, ripened peaches and boiling water. Visit the website linked below for a number of simple, healthy iced …

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New York Times: Global Diabetes Rates Are Rising as Obesity Spreads; 6/10/15

June 10, 2015

 

New York Times: Global Diabetes Rates Are Rising as Obesity Spreads

A new study has been published in the British medical journal, The Lancet reporting that there has been a 45% increase in the prevalence of diabetes worldwide. This study analyzed over 35,000 sources of data from 188 countries that covered the time period of 1990-2013. In this 23 year time period, the study notes that the United States had a 71% increase in the prevalence of diabetes, the largest of any country in the study. …

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Grilled Peaches with Yogurt and Honey

June 08, 2015

Summer is a great time to eat as much fresh produce as you can. Many people love to make pies and cobblers with summer fruit such as peaches, strawberries, and blueberries. Instead of pies and cobblers that are high calories and high sugar, try these grilled peaches from skinnytaste.com for a healthier option. They are a delicious treat and at less than 100 calories per serving, make a perfect ending to a summer BBQ.

Ingredients:

1/4 cup fat free vanilla Greek yogurt
1/8 tsp cinnamon
2 large ripe peaches, …

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Summer Frozen Fruit Pops

June 08, 2015

Summer is a great time for the outdoors and that familiar noise of the ice cream truck. While there is something special about running out and buying your favorite ice cream treat, you can add a lot of extra calories and sugar to your diet. Instead, try these frozen fruit pops from skinny taste that are refreshing, delicious, and healthy. Make sure that you only use 100% juice and feel free to mix it up and add whatever fruit you like! They are very easy …

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Policy Link: The Movement for Local Food Procurement; 6/5/15

June 05, 2015

Does knowing where your food came from factor in to choosing what you eat? If so, you’re part of a growing trend in which knowing where your food comes from is almost just as important as what kind of food you are eating. A movement to grow, sell, and purchase local foods is sweeping across the nation as cities and states are developing policies to provide access to locally grown food for low-income families. Local food helps to provide low-income families with healthier options and …

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Time Magazine: Subway Is Dropping Artificial Ingredients; 6/5/15

June 05, 2015

On June 4th, Subway announced that it is joining in with other fast food restaurants in removing all artificial flavors, colors, and preservatives from its food within the next two years. All artificial ingredients, including yellow used to dye banana peppers, will be changed over to natural ingredients by 2017. The chain already removed an artificial ingredient from its bread last year and is continuing the trend that other fast food chains are already on board with. In addition to Subway, McDonald’s, Taco Bell, and …

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Mayo Clinic Q and A: Walking can be an excellent part of weight-loss plan; 6/4/15

June 04, 2015

Many studies have found that walking can be an effective and easy exercise for everyone who wants to lose weight. A study even found that walking was the most effective exercise for pregnant women to control or lose weight. Walking can be the easiest exercise since you don’t need any special equipment other than a good pair of shoes, and you can walk everywhere (office building, neighborhood, and track). No need for a gym membership!  In addition, some studies show that wearing an activity tracker …

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AARP: A Delicious Diet That Protects Your Memory; 6/4/15

June 04, 2015

A new study published in JAMA Internal Medicine found that following a Mediterranean diet by adding additional helpings of extra-virgin olive oil and nuts can help protect your memory and thinking skills. Previous studies have already found that the Mediterranean diet-rich in whole grains, vegetables, fish and legumes such as beans or lentils, protects both hearts and brains. The researchers believe that antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agents in the Mediterranean diet help protect the brain. In addition, extra-virgin olive oil and nuts are especially rich in …

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Washington Post: Women of all ages more likely to have serious mental health problems than men, report says; 6/3/15

June 03, 2015

 

Washington Post: Women of all ages more likely to have serious mental health problems than men, report says

A report issued by The National Center for Health Statistics reveals that women in every age category are more likely than men to experience serious mental health problems. In addition to this information, the report found that people regardless of gender who experienced serious psychological distress were twice as likely to have heart disease or diabetes drawing a distinct connection between chronic health conditions and mental wellness. While …

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Time: Health Experts Reveal How Much Standing At Work You Should Actually Be Doing; 6/3/15

June 03, 2015

A new study published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine recommends that people who work desk jobs should stand for at least two hours each day. According to this study, those who work in offices spend up to three-fourths of their days sitting and most of their time sitting lasts for periods of 30 minutes or more. Researchers note that while the goal should be to spend two hours of each day standing, there’s no need to do this all at once. They suggest …

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Huffington Post: Black Women With Low Income Levels At Greater Risk For Heart Disease, Stroke; 6/2/15

June 02, 2015

 

Huffington Post: Black Women With Low Income Levels At Greater Risk For Heart Disease, Stroke

Research by the National Human Genome Institute shows that African-American women and African-Americans under the age of 50 with low socioeconomic statutes have the highest risks for experiencing heart disease and stroke. Lead researcher Samson Y. Gebreab says that the higher rates for the risk of heart disease for poor black women could be attributed to poor black women experiencing higher rates of psychological stressors such as discrimination and chronic stress. …

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CBS News: The psychology of getting kids (and spouses) to eat better; 6/1/15

June 01, 2015

 

CBS News: The psychology of getting kids (and spouses) to eat better

Having trouble getting your family to eat their fruits and vegetables? A new study from Cornell University suggests that focusing on the benefits of eating healthy rather than the downfalls of unhealthy food may get your family to enjoy eating healthy. Researchers analyzed over 40 studies from around the world finding that positive reinforcement yields better results than negative talk when encouraging children and adults to eat healthier. Next time your family doesn’t want …

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CBS News: Traffic noise may increase risk of belly fat; 5/29/15

May 29, 2015

 

CBS News: Traffic noise may increase risk of belly fat

A new study out of Sweden suggests that there is a connection between environmental noise pollution, noise from roadways, air traffic, and railways, and an increased risk for abdominal obesity. The research published in Occupation& Environmental Medicine also suggests that this type of noise acts as a physiological stressor that increases the production of the hormone cortisol. The increased production of this hormone is linked to increased abdominal fat. This study is yet another in an …

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Time: Trans Fats Are Hiding All Over Your Grocery List; 5/29/15

May 29, 2015

 

Time: Trans Fats Are Hiding All Over Your Grocery List

A new analysis by the Environmental Working Group finds that over one-third of the foods we buy in grocery stores contain harmful trans fats. The EWG analyzed over 87,000 foods for ingredients such as partially hydrogenated oils, fully hydrogenated oils, and refined oils and found that 27% of analyzed foods contained one or more of these ingredients. Surprisingly, the report also suggests that some foods that are labeled as having zero trans fats actually do contain …

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NBC News : American Obesity Rates are on the Rise, Gallup Poll Finds; 5/28/15

May 28, 2015

 

NBC News : American Obesity Rates are on the Rise, Gallup Poll Finds

A new poll released by Gallup-Healthways shows that nearly 28% of Americans are clinically obese. The survey which polled over 170,000 Americans representing all 50 states and the District of Columbia found that Mississippi is the most obese state and Hawaii is the least obese state. The survey also found that for a small number of states, nearly one-third of their populations reported being obese. In addition to these numbers, the Gallup-Healthways survey …

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Town Hall Ignites Conversations about Infant Mortality

May 27, 2015

In the weeks leading up to the Health Gap’s town hall on infant mortality, a call was issued throughout the city encouraging those who could attend to join us in the fight against infant mortality. On Saturday, May 16th, the call was answered as nearly 100 area residents came to Frederick Douglass Elementary School to find out how they could become a part of the solution.

The town hall was moderated by Jade West of 100.3 Old School Cincinnati and featured a panel composed of Dr. …

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CBS News: Traffic noise may increase risk of belly fat; 5/27/15

May 27, 2015

A new study out of Sweden suggests that there is a connection between environmental noise pollution, noise from roadways, air traffic, and railways, and an increased risk for abdominal obesity. The research published in Occupation& Environmental Medicine also suggests that this type of noise acts as a physiological stressor that increases the production of the hormone cortisol. The increased production of this hormone is linked to increased abdominal fat. This study is yet another in an increasingly long line of research highlighting how our health …

[ Read More → ]

Healthy Memorial Day Tips

May 22, 2015

 

Holidays are a great time to get together with family and friends. Memorial Day is at the beginning of summer which means many people will be having barbeques or bringing a side dish to a cookout. While these events are always fun, they also promote overeating which increases calorie consumption.

 

Follow these easy tips from the Cleveland Clinic to have a healthy cookout this year!

 

Choose a lean entrée with less fat. Instead of greasy hamburgers and hot dogs, try grilling fish, chicken, and lean cuts of …

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NPR: Heart Risk Factors May Affect Black Women More Than White Women; 5/22/15

May 22, 2015

A new study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association found that for African-American women, it only takes two metabolic abnormalities to raise the risk of heart disease. The study which looked at data from over 14,000 postmenopausal women revealed that when only looking at instances of metabolic syndrome (high triglycerides, bad cholesterol, abdominal fat, high blood pressure, and impaired glucose metabolism), the risks of heart disease for black women is often underestimated. Conversely, the risk for white women is overestimated when only …

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Time: Ballet Isn’t Good Exercise for Kids — but Hip-Hop Is, Study Says; 5/21/15

May 21, 2015

At a time when childhood obesity rates are still rising, it’s important to keep your children active. Enrolling your child in dance classes is one way to get the moving. However, a recent study reveals that not all dance classes provide young children with high enough exercise levels for their age. The study published in Pediatrics found that for young children, Hip-Hop and Jazz classes provided the most exercise while Ballet classes offered the least. It’s important to note, that as children age, Ballet and …

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New York Times: Rise in Suicide by Black Children Surprises Researchers; 5/21/15

May 21, 2015

Mental health is a topic not often spoken of in the black community. But new research suggests that is time to start having open dialogues on the topic, especially with youth.  New research published in JAMA Pediatrics found that the suicide rate for black children as doubled since the 1990’s while the rates for white children has remained stable. This study is the first to find a higher rate of suicide among blacks of any age than whites for any age group. The researchers did …

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CBS News: Preschoolers not getting enough physical activity in child care; 5/20/15

May 20, 2015

A small study out of Seattle, Washington shows that children in daycare and preschools are not getting enough exercise. The study, published in Pediatrics found that preschool aged children were only getting about half of the recommended amount of daily exercise for their age group. The research which analyzed almost 100 children in daycare and preschool found that 73% of the group were mostly sedentary throughout the day.

To Learn More, Click Here.

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